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Your Personality & Struggles are Part of Your Brand with Tracy Raftl

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In this episode of 360 Health Biz Podcast, we have long time blogger & acne coach turned brand & web designer, Tracy Raftl join us to talk about branding your business. Part of Tracy’s success when she started The Love Vitamin was showing her true self – which included being vulnerable and showing her struggles with her acne.

Many health coaches and practitioners think they need to be perfect in order to help others heal and in this episode, we learn that this is not the case. Showing your audience how you got to where you are (and how you continue to grow and heal) shows your true & most authentic self.

In this episode:
- Tracy’s journey from blogging to selling ebooks for adult acne
- showing your personality in your content
- colours & fonts that portray your personality
- the importance of showing vulnerability & struggles
- brands take time to take hold

While your fonts & colours should depict your personality, branding is more than just the visuals. Your brand is your personality, your niche, your service, the way that you work with people. And the most important thing with branding is consistency – maintaining the same look & language on your website, your social media platforms, your videos and your programs & downloads.

Tracy Raftl got her start online in 2011 when she founded the super popular natural acne blog, The Love Vitamin. Now she helps unstoppable women brand themselves online, and builds them impactful, high-converting, personality-driven websites that make them feel confident to go to the next level in their business.

Tracy's FREEBIE: https://littlebeastdesign.com/brand-style-quiz/

https://littlebeastdesign.com
https://www.instagram.com/tracyraftl/
https://www.pinterest.ca/tracyraftl/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/tracy-raftl/
https://www.facebook.com/littlebeastdesign/

Connect with us on social:
instagram.com/360healthbizpodcast
facebook.com/360healthbizpodcast

instagram.com/kendraperryinc
instagram.com/sleeplikeaboss_

TRANSCRIPTS

Christine:
Hello everyone and welcome to this brand new episode of our beautiful podcast, the 360 Health Biz Podcast. And we are welcoming you today to a brand new episode, which is going to be absolutely phenomenal because it's about a topic that Kendra and I love, preach, eye-roll about, vent about, all the time, so stay tuned for that. It's going to be a bomb. But before we actually get started, here's something that we want to share with you. Because we had the wonderful Leah who took the time to send us a personal message on Instagram and she says, "Kendra, thank you for your amazing podcast. I just found it this week and have been binging hardcore. You and Christine are just so fun and knowledgeable. I'm just starting my business and it has been so helpful. I did my training through the Functional Medicine Coaching Academy in collaboration with the Institute of Functional Medicine."

Christine:
Wow, we do love to be called fun and knowledgeable. Thank you very much. So we do take that and thank you so, so much for letting us know. As you know, it's always great to talk to this microphone and to this sort of camera, but not knowing if anyone actually gives a toss. So thanks for letting us know, we really appreciate it. And now without further ado, my beautiful hostess with the mostest is going to introduce our wonderful guest that we have in today. Kendra, take it away.

Kendra:
Awesome. Christine, I'm so excited for our guest today. It kinda goes way back. I'm actually super excited to introduce her because I actually first started following her probably... I don't even know. It was probably 10 years ago, maybe even longer, when I was struggling with acne and I was really interested in natural solutions and I stumbled across her website, which was a huge blog at the time and it probably still is, and I was so inspired by her and her blog and all her articles that it actually led to me starting my own blog, which was not as successful or not even close. It wasn't successful at all, but that's okay. And funny enough, I actually wrote my first guest post on her website and it was about coffee enemas, which is really-

Christine:
[crosstalk 00:02:08] baby. I'm not surprised. Obviously it's got something-

Tracy Raftl:
I was trying to remember and I was like "she wrote a blog post, I know it was something to do with poop" but I couldn't remember what. Of course, coffee enemas.

Kendra:
Totally, and you know what guys? I still love my coffee enemas. I still do them. I think they're great, but I remember at the time, just there were a lot of comments that were like, "This is terrible, who would ever do this?" And I was like, I feel so bad about myself. It was so new. I'd never put myself out there on the internet, so it was quite the experience, [crosstalk 00:02:37] but I kept in touch with Tracy over the years. We connected again through functional diagnostic nutrition when she did the program and then we've kept in touch just through social media. So I'm really excited to introduce Tracy Raftl and just to give her a quick introduction, she started online in 2011 when she founded the super popular natural acne blog, The Love Vitamin. Now she helps unstoppable women brand themselves online and builds them impactful, high converting, personality driven websites that makes them feel confident to take their business to the next level. And guys, you should definitely check out her shit because her design is unbelievable.

Christine:
Beautiful. I'm very jealous I have to say.[crosstalk 00:03:24] Very, super envious. With love.

Tracy Raftl:
Thank you.

Kendra:
Thanks Tracy. What's going on?

Tracy Raftl:
Wow. Well thank you for that lovely introduction. It's lovely to be here with you ladies. What we're going to be talking about today, I believe, is just putting yourself out there and just being 100% real and my journey with The Love Vitamin. I think the reason that it was so damn successful was because I was so vulnerable, real about my struggles. So I started The Love vitamin in, like you said, 2011. I was in my early twenties and I had horrible skin. It was horrific. It was so bad. And if you've ever had skin troubles, you understand how embarrassing that is, how... not just embarrassing, but just soul crushing it is. It's just really, really emotionally painful.

Tracy Raftl:
So I, like Kendra back then, I was reading other people's acne blogs and I got really inspired and I thought, "You know what, I will have to share, I can do this." So I started the blog and I had all of those thoughts where it was like, "Well I've cleared up the majority of the severe acne I had," but I was still struggling with mild acne. I was still struggling with the fear of acne, which was a big thing, and so I had those thoughts where it was like, "Oh, who am I to be talking about this? I should have perfect skin, otherwise why should I even bother?" But the thing was, I didn't do that. I shared all of my struggles. I talked about the experiments I was doing to heal that last part of my acne. I talked about all the emotions that I was feeling, about every time I got a pimple, even if it wasn't that bad, it was still emotionally devastating because just how intense it was when my skin was bad. I still have that.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, just all those emotions. That fear was... it was definitely still there, but I explored all of that on my blog and I believe that that was actually what made it so successful, because people could relate to it. They knew that I wasn't perfect. They knew that... Yeah, people are intimidated by people that are perfect.

Christine:
When did you realize that that was your secret spice, so to say?

Tracy Raftl:
I don't know if I ever realized it, I just kind of did it. I think, I mean... Yeah, I studied business. I took courses to learn how to blog, and I think they recommended, don't hide yourself, don't hide your struggle. And I think being an open book just comes naturally to me. I can't keep secrets basically. So, it was just really natural and I think I saw some of the bloggers that I was following, that's what they were doing as well and I recognized that that was why I felt connected to them, even if I didn't recognize it.

Kendra:
I'll never forget Tracy, I'll never forget the photos of when you had really, and you just posted those online. And I remember just being like "wow", I can't believe she's doing it. But I was so grateful about it because I was just like "She really has struggled with this." To see the transition and I even remember later on I think, I don't know if you were in, I feel like I'm like such a creep cause I like know your whole life. I remember I think you were in Australia and you've broken out a little bit and you were showing and taking pictures and you were like, "I got this like big cyst, like between my eyebrows or whatever." It almost couldn't breathe because I was so ashamed of that at the time. And I just hid it and I would hide inside. And I just so grateful that you were just out there, baring it all.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. I mean that was a big change because before I started the blog, it was like, I like acne was, I was not going to like, even if they could see it everywhere, it was like that was something I was never gonna like the topic was never gonna come up between me and anyone. And I found that was so, so stressful because it was like, "They can all see it."

Kendra:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
It was like this thing that I couldn't admit or talk about with anyone and it was, it just felt like a pressure cooker. It was like "I am struggling with this. I can't say anything about it." Then when I decided to start the blog and put it all out there, it was a big relief actually. So you listening, you might be feeling the same way where it's like, Oh, you might have this weight of like, Oh, "I'm still kind of struggling with this. I'm not 100%."

Kendra:
yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
Or whatever.

Kendra:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
That you might feel like that's a weight.

Christine:
or have a little setback, you know?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, exactly.

Christine:
A lot of people who are just when they're sick, they have a setback and they get they're old symptoms back and it's like, "Oh no, I'm not an expert anymore because..." but it was circumstantial. So yeah, I guess it's nice to [crosstalk 00:08:47]

Tracy Raftl:
Exactly, and even talking through that so that people know when they get setbacks, it doesn't mean that yeah, it's all over, it's all coming back forever, which I know is easy to.

Christine:
Totally. And so what about[crosstalk 00:09:01]

Kendra:
Because I mean most health coaches for the most part are in this because of their own struggle. Right.

Tracy Raftl:
Exactly.

Kendra:
And a lot of people are for niching in the thing that they struggled with. And, I mean, I talked to a lot of health coaches and I just see a lot of them being like, "well I can't talk about anxiety because I still have anxiety or I can't talk about this because I don't have this. I'm super passionate about anxiety. I want to talk about it, but I still have it, so how can I talk about it?" And so they're a bit paralyzed by the fact that they think they're waiting for the moment when that goes away, before they can start speaking about it. You think that does their audience a disservice?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, 100%. Because I mean like you can speak to it Kendra like what if I had just decided to never say anything? They want to know everything that's going on. They want to know that you're struggling too. It's so relatable.

Kendra:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
It really helps people if you're just upfront with it.

Christine:
So what about those who come to you? Because obviously now your specialist is in branding. You don't have, cause I'm one of those who don't have their own struggle. For me it was the opposite. I was feeling illegitimate cause I didn't have the struggles. You are this branding specialist now in the house. I'm really excited because you see these two people and you advise them, and you coach them, and consult with them. How do you do that? Basically you figured out at some point that honesty and being out there and vulnerable is the key. When did you figure out, so how do you, first of all, how do you coach these people? But also what was your process to understand what it was you were doing and how did you teach that?

Tracy Raftl:
You're talking about the branding part of it?

Christine:
Yeah. And just being you, that is actually branding.

Tracy Raftl:
Right.

Christine:
I don't think a lot of people know that that belongs to the world or branding. For them branding is a logo.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. It's definitely much more than that.

Christine:
Why do you think that the struggle with niching will feeling legitimate has something to do with branding? I find a lot of people have no clue what branding actually is.

Tracy Raftl:
Right.

Christine:
So how did that kaleidoscope of thing happen for you?

Tracy Raftl:
Right. Well let's discuss what brand [crosstalk 00:11:20]

Christine:
I know it's lot. We'll deal with it.

Kendra:
So many bombs of questions there.

Christine:
I know. [crosstalk 00:11:27]

Tracy Raftl:
That's a really good question there with the logo because a lot of people think branding is just a logo. Branding is, the whole thing of what your business is. It's basically the perception of what other people think of you and your business. It's a culmination of the visual design, but it's also your brand's personality, your niche, your service, the way that you work with people. The way that you speak. With Kendra for example, you're very kinda to the point and you swear and whatever that's part of your brand, right? It's like what we can expect from you. And so I always, always recommend, I mean... the majority of the time you like if you're a coach. Your brand should be based on your personality. They are slightly different. Your brand is an entity and you are an entity. But your brand should be based on your personality. It doesn't have to be everything that you are, but it shouldn't be something that you're completely not.

Christine:
I love that. So what if you're not included?

Tracy Raftl:
If you're lazy and complaining, you probably don't want to like [crosstalk 00:12:57] too much.

Christine:
Even though that's a brand on YouTube.

Kendra:
Your brand, Christine, lazy and complaining. You like own that shit. It's so funny.

Christine:
I own my laziness like a boss.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah.[crosstalk 00:13:04] You could even put that into your brand, right? That could be a thing,

Christine:
I do.

Tracy Raftl:
You want to highlight the better things and then you could throw in some of that as well. And that can make you relatable as well, right? Because it's like, "yeah, I'm lazy." So it basically, but if you, you know, we're very multifaceted people, right? We all have very... so many different parts of our personality and things that we are, your brand doesn't have to broadcast every single thing that you are. But if you are a super funny person, you probably don't want to create a brand that's super staunch and serious or if you are super chill and soft spoken, you don't want to have like a bold, brash kind of, possibly swearing brand, it doesn't work. People get that there's something off about it.

Tracy Raftl:
When someone is trying to be, someone that they're not, it just comes off as sort of fake. People might not quite know what it is, but there's just something off about it that doesn't sit right and it doesn't feel good to you. It's hard trying to be someone that you're not, right? Sometimes it's hard to be who we are too because we don't know who we are. That's a whole other story. If you're not a funny person, you're trying to be funny. That's hard. It makes business, it makes you more attractive to your ideal client and it makes business just feel better for you.

Christine:
Do you find that people actually always know who they are or they come across as, so you say, for example,

Tracy Raftl:
No.

Christine:
If you're funny, you might not want a super serious brand. Do you find that funny people know that they're funny.

Tracy Raftl:
Not always.[crosstalk 00:15:02]

Christine:
How they come across.

Tracy Raftl:
They very much get caught up in like, Oh, "I think I should be this or I think I shouldn't be bad, or I'm inspired by that person so I should have a brand exactly like them." And then it's like, "Oh shit, this is really hard because this isn't me at all." So that's why working with a brand expert can be really helpful because they can see you a lot clearer than you can see yourself. If you don't have the money to work with a brand expert, you can ask your family and friends and say, "Okay, give me five characteristics or personality traits that you feel like sums me up." Ask a few different people to get sort of an idea and go from there. I think that's a really great start.[crosstalk 00:15:47]

Christine:
I just want to say, you have to watch the video guys because Kendra and I have both like, [crosstalk 00:15:53] like bobbing their heads.

Tracy Raftl:
I like this validation. Thank you.

Kendra:
Were just like yup.

Christine:
Yup. Preach sister.

Kendra:
I think it's such a good idea. It's something that we actually had our mastermind members doing when we did our a lesson on branding. We were like, you got to figure out who you are. You got to figure out how you talk. You need to speak in your voice. The way I talk, that's just the way I talk. If you meet me in person, what you see is what you get. It's the same shit. But I think, yeah, you're right. A lot of people don't know who they are, they don't understand their personality. And I think that's another reason why building a business is such a deep dive into personal development.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, it is for sure. You definitely learn a lot about yourself if you want to succeed anyway. You really have to get in touch with that.

Christine:
Are there any certain things that you ask people to do before they come work with you? Because I guess if they're not ready to actually figure out who they are, which might be much more challenging than they actually understand. Being yourself is one of the most difficult things to do. How do you help them?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. It's either really difficult or really easy.

Kendra:
Yes.

Tracy Raftl:
Well if you're getting a website done with me, I pretty much make it a requirement that we do brand name work before that. I have a really in depth questionnaire and of course that goes with it to explain all of this stuff step-by-step. They fill it out and then they get consulting time with me. So it's kind of like I make them do it because I don't want to build them a website without them.

Kendra:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
Understanding this stuff because then your website's going to suck and it's not gonna speak to who you want it to speak to and it's not going to be effective. And I don't want to keep the money for that. So we always do that. That's what I'm there to help with. Does that answer the question?

Kendra:
Totally. Yeah. And I want to circle back around to this like idea of vulnerability and sharing. Cause,

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah.

Kendra:
Obviously, the definition of being vulnerable I think is to put yourself in harm's way or to make yourself,

Tracy Raftl:
You're right.

Kendra:
[crosstalk 00:17:59] Right. I think because of what it is, it's scary and it is unbearable.

Tracy Raftl:
Oh yeah.

Kendra:
So what advice would you give to people who, they're new, maybe they haven't shared their story too much or done anything too vulnerable. How can they get started? Cause obviously that you don't just want to go from like zero to nothing cause that's gonna make people shit their pants basically.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah.

Christine:
How can you help them to go, let's take a medium like posting salads or letters on Instagram. To becoming vulnerable. It seems like such a stretch.

Tracy Raftl:
It does seem like a leap. I would start with just sharing your personal journey with how you got to here. If it is your health struggle or proceeding your case. You said you don't have that health struggle, but how did you actually get to, you must have some stories. So how you got to where you are here helping people. Just share that story, but share it in a little more detail than you would and it should feel a little bit scary not too scary, not to shit your pants scary, but just add a little bit in there so that you feel a little bit uncomfortable. You have to feel a little uncomfortable in order to get comfortable with that memorability. I know that's scary. I know. I like to think of fear as just think of it as a sensation. You're not going to die. Nothing's going to happen. The reason that we fear vulnerability is because of that danger in our heads of "People are going to judge me, I'm going to be exiled or whatever."

Kendra:
[crosstalk 00:19:44] I mean let's be honest some people will judge you and you know,

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. That's the other thing is that some people will judge you and they just don't fucking matter. And I know that is so hard for a lot of people. We want everybody's like us, but if we really want to stand out and speak to those people who are just so bright for us, we have to just not give a shit about the other people, which I know is something that is learned. It's not always, it doesn't come naturally, but once you start to put yourself out there and you start to feel that connection with people, hopefully you'll get to the point where it's okay if some people don't like you.

Kendra:
I agree.

Tracy Raftl:
Happens to all of us.

Kendra:
It does, the more you get out there, I mean I offend people all the time just because sometimes an ass in person, it happens, people take things I say the wrong way and it's fine. But I think it's always a choice whether you want to engage and you don't have to.

Tracy Raftl:
Exactly.

Kendra:
Right?

Tracy Raftl:
No.

Kendra:
And be over with it. But if do choose to engage, like I recommend that people wait until their nervous system has calmed down before they [crosstalk 00:20:54]

Christine:
Sleep over it.

Tracy Raftl:
Everybody who's successful has some people who are, you know, maybe going to write a mean comment. You get 10 comments and you focus on that mean asshole. It's like fuck that guy.

Christine:
And everyone does that. I mean it's just,

Tracy Raftl:
I know like I used to make YouTube videos, I ended up turning off the comments cause people are just fucking assholes.

Kendra:
YouTube is the worst

Tracy Raftl:
Oh yeah.

Kendra:
It's the worst, Cause I think people have accounts that aren't, you can't connect them to who they are.

Christine:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, it's so bad.

Kendra:
We'll file and whatever. But YouTube sometimes. I mean I've had people be like, "How could I take advice from someone with such a stupid hat?" I live in Canada and it's cold in here.

Tracy Raftl:
Don't make fun of my tuque okay?[crosstalk 00:21:44] Kendra and I are both Canadian by the way.

Kendra:
Yeah. Christine's like, "I don't know what's going on the American,"[crosstalk 00:21:54]

Christine:
What are you speaking about? I don't understand. It's a hat.

Tracy Raftl:
It's a tuque.

Kendra:
People in the States called tuque's like what I'm wearing right now, a beanie, which is ridiculous because I think of a beanie of one of those little [crosstalk 00:22:05]

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah me too with the propeller

Kendra:
That covers like the baldhead of,

Christine:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
It's a tuque.

Christine:
A what?

Kendra:
A Canadian word. A tuque.

Tracy Raftl:
A tuque.

Christine:
All right Canadian.

Tracy Raftl:
It's French Canadian.[crosstalk 00:22:20]

Kendra:
Anyways.

Christine:
So I think we covered like the most important, figuring out who you are either through other people's eyes, but people who you trust or mistake. Don't make a survey on, I dunno, some stranger's website or something like that. And then,

Tracy Raftl:
yeah, get a few opinions.

Christine:
Get a few opinions but people who you trust. How do you translate that into your online presence? Let's put it that way.

Tracy Raftl:
Okay.

Christine:
Well even your own presence, like even the way that you want to show up. I think it's so, like when you do videos, should you dress a certain way? I kind of, I don't wear makeup today, but usually when I know that I'm bashing the videos, I polish myself up a little bit, which people could say it's not authentic, but how do you translate? "Okay and I know I'm comfortable with who I am. How do I represent that in terms of me, my colors, my style, maybe even my fun?" How does that all happen?

Tracy Raftl:
Right. That's why I'm getting really clear on your brand, personality is so important. So when you have those five or more. Start with five, sort of descriptors, then just think about... sometimes it's easier to think about somebody else who has these descriptors and think about, well, how would you know if one of them is, funny, straight talking, whatever. How would that person speak? Right? If they had that personality, how would, like your visual presence. So, for example, if you are like a bold, really bold kind of brash person, you probably want to have bold colors to match that. Right? If your kind of a more soft..

Christine:
We can't hear you.

Kendra:
We just lose audio?

Christine:
Yeah. Tracy? For some reason...

Kendra:
We just lost your audio.

Christine:
I don't know.

Kendra:
That's super weird. Oh shit. Should restart the meeting or?

Christine:
It just went. Maybe if you just quickly leave the room and come back.

Kendra:
Do you want to just exit and come back in? That'll probably fix it. Oh man, you're getting so fired up there.

Christine:
I know. It was just a juicy part. I'm just like, no.

Kendra:
I don't know. I've had these weird zoom things before.

Christine:
Can you hear us Tracy? Okay. So just leave the room, exit the meeting and then come back in.

Tracy Raftl:
Okay. Actually.

Christine:
Oh, now it's working.

Tracy Raftl:
Let me do, I don't know, video settings. Let me just choose the different mic maybe just to,

Kendra:
That's fine.

Tracy Raftl:
Okay.

Kendra:
Cool.

Christine:
So what did we hear last?

Tracy Raftl:
Right. What we were saying?

Christine:
So juicy, it was, Oh, like imagining someone with similar traits, but how would they speak if you have bold colors?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, right, exactly. I think I was saying about the visual style of it. You want to choose colors for example, that you like, but also match the brand personality. So if you're bold and brash, choose bold colors, don't choose really pastel muted colors.If you are more soft-spoken, you can choose, softer colors because otherwise it won't match, right? You want to have it just kind of amplify that.

Tracy Raftl:
When you're writing for example, think about how you would actually say that out loud if you were talking to a friend. So if you're writing something, use slang, use contractions. Make it really informal. Don't write it like your college essay, right? You want to write it like you would actually speak and it's helpful to actually say it out loud when you write it. When you're on video, exactly. Just say it how you would actually speak to a friend. Don't try, you swear or don't, if that's not something you do and what you should wear. Generally it's, wear something that you feel comfortable in, like don't wear something that you would never wear. You are talking about, "Oh I like to put on makeup." That's fine. You probably put on makeup if you go out for dinner or something. Right? Like it's like a nice version of you.

Christine:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
You're not like wearing something that, it's not like makeup just doesn't feel like you or that not,

Christine:
No

Tracy Raftl:
Right? So that's still you and that's totally fine. Does that make sense?

Christine:
Yeah. What would maybe use the highlight? Like if I look at my wardrobe just visually, it's pretty muted I would say. But then you have the occasional total crazy frog that I do.

Tracy Raftl:
Right.

Christine:
So just something pop that you can use sometimes, I guess.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. And something like that. It's like, well you probably don't wear those all the time, but you can just throw that in sometimes. Cause that's part of who you are.

Christine:
Yeah. And it's so interesting because I got, usually my assistant knows me really well, so she creates my newsletters and it all looks very branded cause she knows me very well. But today, she sent me a draft and I was just saying, I didn't know why, it doesn't jive. There was a lot of purple in there and things. Oh no. It's the first time it ever happened. I find that is also, it's difficult to let someone else know what your brand is if they're suppose to do, Kendra and I, we don't do our posts anymore. Like, yes we do, but we don't do graphics for example. I find it really helpful if you do work with a brand specialist to just have that run sheet. [crosstalk 00:28:10] somebody out there who have no clue what we're talking about, what that process is, what the pros are of actually investing in a process like this.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, exactly. It's very important to, in building your brand is to use the same visual. Those same personality, same tone of voice to be consistent across all of your platforms. So that's your website, your social media, in-person video, whatever. Everywhere you are is to use the same things because then people start to get to know you, they start to recognize you. Consistency. They trust it a little bit more. You seem more professional. To have that consistency, it's really, really helpful to have what you were talking about is a brand guide. So it's just a document that sort of lays out all of these things. So, here's the colors that we use and here's the actual like hex code, which is like the exact code for that color so that you can use it in graphics.

Tracy Raftl:
Choose some, a few fonts and stick to those. Choose that personality tone of voice. That's kind of the basics. There's a bit more if you're working with a brand specialist, but if you're just doing this yourself, you can just create this document and just have it there so that when you're making something, you can refer to it and just use it to just be consistent with what doing. And then when you or if you ever, have a team like Christina and Kendra, then it's really, really, really helpful because you need your team to understand what the brand is and how to use it consistently. That's what a branding specialist can help with. But even if you don't work with someone, I recommend definitely just putting something together for your own reference.

Christine:
Yeah. How do you see businesses shift in terms of success once they've worked with a brand specialist? Like if we have a before and after kind of thing?

Tracy Raftl:
There's never any like obvious,

Christine:
You will make six figures when you work with me.

Tracy Raftl:
Can't say that. If you are just starting out in your business, you're probably gonna see less upfront, kind of a change. Because branding takes time to take hold, right? It's good to really establish that right away because then your brand has time to grow. People have time to get to know your brand, and you're going to accelerate a lot faster than if you didn't do this work.

Christine:
Right

Tracy Raftl:
If your sort of like, you've been in business for a while and you're like, kind of know what you're doing and you've got, you know, but you just want to take it to the next level, I think that's sort of the point where it can really make a big difference. And a lot of that can actually be just from confidence.

Christine:
Yeah.

Tracy Raftl:
In having all of that defined. Having that brand guide, knowing who your ideal customer is, how to speak to them. Having that really professional visual kind of appeal, that makes such a big difference in people's confidence. So way back in the day with The Love Vitamin, I think it was like 2013 or something, I was making like, I don't know, two or $3,000 a month or something. It was great cause I was making it for my own business,

Kendra:
True.

Tracy Raftl:
But it wasn't like a lot of money. It's kind of hard to live on that. I had always kind of done my own branding and it wasn't great back then. And so I decided to invest in a new website, and new branding and it was that, that kind of gave me the confidence to put out a new course and sell at a higher price. And my business went, that's when I made six figures. So that's a very, clear example of what it can do for you. It's just, it can really take things to the next level. But if I had done that right away, probably not, but it might've accelerated quicker.

Christine:
Yeah. Plus, I think people also need to realize that they probably need to invest in a branding specialist on a regular basis because you just change.

Tracy Raftl:
Exactly.

Christine:
My brand, Strange Brookside, psychic zillion times. I'm happy with the one I have now, but not looking at yours and again, thinking maybe in six months I actually am going to invest again or I mean both Kendra and I have worked with Jamie Jensen to figure out our stories and figure out our main points and because you just have those blind spots and they evolve and they change.

Tracy Raftl:
Absolutely. Yeah.

Christine:
I'll give you that. It's something you regularly invest in as you change, as a business changes.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, for sure. And I think when you very first start out, often you, sometimes you need to experiment a little like decent DIY, just sorta like get a little bit of a direction because businesses do evolve pretty quickly. You're like, "Oh, I thought I was going to do that, but actually I want to do that." And experimenting a little bit in the beginning is helpful. And then when you sort of start to get, I think that's a good time to invest and then, but yeah, businesses are always evolving. It's like something that felt like you four year, three or four years ago, that might be completely different now. Maybe you have new programs or maybe you just have a completely different style or feel about you. That's how I felt about my website in 2014 when I made it over and then my business went way up. That was me back then. But now I don't feel like that really resonates with me now. So it's like things just evolve. So yeah,

Kendra:
It's such a good conversation because I'm always harping on health coaches who invest like three or $4,000 in a website right out of the gate.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah.

Kendra:
Which, I would never recommend. And I think I was making a story about that and I saw you watch my story and I was like, "Oh, I hope Tracy doesn't take [crosstalk 00:34:25]

Tracy Raftl:
I was like, "Kendra."

Kendra:
She's gonna give me shit for that. [crosstalk 00:34:29] But you don't know who you are. Your niche might change. Like there's so many things that might change and you have so little like business intelligence at that point that you don't really know what works. And I can't tell you how many coaches who have invested three, $4,000 that they didn't really have in a website that not only looks like crap but like isn't what they actually want and isn't serving them. So I'm like you want to just test things out. Personally I think you can start getting clients without even having a website. You know what I think to start like just take the step like get on social media and have a way to build your email list, like have your offer. But once you start working with clients you'll get a sense of who you are and what you actually want to do. And I think at that point when you have that higher intelligence and what you are doing.

Tracy Raftl:
Exactly. And I'm first to admit a website isn't everything, but it is an important piece of your marketing that people can go to and get a sense for what you do and who you do it for. But it's not everything. And yeah, I agree with like when you, right out of the gate it's just, it's not the investment that's the best. I think it's usually when you're like ready to of, yeah.

Christine:
And it's so interesting cause I wasn't a monster man last October, where we met and we were all kind of six figureish rich hovering people above, below just below, but similar States of businesses. And they were on two or three brand specialists there. And one of the biggest struggles was that people had a completely wrong perception of what branding actually was. So they attracted a lot of newbies who were expecting just a website. I didn't understand that they had to do all of this ground work. And so now you really have to differentiate, well what I tell people between a website designer who will take a branding portfolio and then do the website for you and a brand specialist, it's two very different things. A lot of people have no idea. We were just brainstorming, is brand strategists still the correct term? Because it's eighties in a way, what people think that it's just such an interesting development in that profession.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. Branding is definitely, it's an ethereal thing that people think they know what it is, but it's not really, but it's so important that you need it. And I mean it's definitely more important than a website in itself. So that's why I said it's kind of a non negotiable, when I work with people I make them a website. But yeah, I had no direction.

Christine:
Yes. So anyone listening before you invest into Facebook ads or before you invest into other crap for thousands and thousands, take your time and when you think you know, then get to a brand specialist and be ready to be ripped apart and put together again.

Tracy Raftl:
100% I think if it is like, yeah, you can go out and do your marketing, but marketing takes a lot of time, money, effort that you would get so much more return if you were really clear on this brand stuff first.

Christine:
Yes.

Tracy Raftl:
There was something I posted on my Instagram that I saw somewhere, some quote that was like, what was the quote? Now I'm gonna forget. It was like marketing is asking someone on a date and branding is the reason they say yes. That's kind of like that and underlying [crosstalk 00:38:04] I like it.

Christine:
I like this. Sometimes people are like,

Kendra:
Oh, it's good shit. Awesome.

Tracy Raftl:
I didn't make that up. So yeah, I mean to

Kendra:
Some person credit out there, so Tracy, I would love you to tell the audience like how people, I know you have a little like gift. You have your little brand quiz, which I actually did and I think I was minimalist chic. Is that a thing?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. We're all chic.

Kendra:
Sweet, cause I'm totally a minimalist. I'm like, yes.

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah, I like that one.

Kendra:
How can you access that quiz?

Tracy Raftl:
Yeah. If you go to a littlebeesdesign.com/quiz or if you just got a Little bees design that you'll see it. It's everywhere. What brands sell are you or what's your brand personality? It's based on visual branding knots. Not so much the underlying personality, but we get way deep into that if we work together.

Christine:
So can I just have one last question? How did you come up with the Little Bees design?

Tracy Raftl:
Well at first I was like I'll just name it after me and then I had a friend who was like, "ah, don't do that name." It's probably an interesting insight. I was racking my brain. Well, I'm a very, very tiny person. I'm like very short. I'm small. There's that. I mostly driven and ambitious, so it was kind of those put together.

Christine:
It's super cute. I love it.

Tracy Raftl:
And I have two little dogs. So they factored in, there was, it was a bunch of stuff, but it just felt right. It was like, yes, it's memorable and it just feels right to me.

Kendra:
So Tracy, do you still do The Love Vitamin or is that kind of,

Tracy Raftl:
I don't put any effort into it, but it exists. And if you need help with acne, all my programs are there and the 500 blog posts or whatever are still there, which is crazy to me. Then I run that many. If you want to check that out, you can go to thelovevitamin.com and yeah, see what I've done with that because it was, it's been super successful and if you want to like have an example, it's worth checking out.

Christine:
Brilliant. Well thank you so much for your brain and sharing [crosstalk 00:40:18] listeners. I feel this was really clear about what branding is and what branding isn't and why it's important. And again, like we really, we really hope people take this to heart because I think it's going to save you tons of money.

Kendra:
Yeah, absolutely. Awesome.

Tracy Raftl:
All right. Thank you.

Christine:
Well that's it, shall we call it a day?

Kendra:
I think we should call it a day. Thanks so much guys. We appreciate it. If you loved this episode, as always, we are asking you for those two minutes to give us a five star review on iTunes or wherever else you can give reviews. I think it's just iTunes. I don't think so. You can on Spotify. I'm not sure. Anyways, if you can give her a review, give it to us and we will give you a shout out on air [crosstalk 00:41:03] or a beautiful face's and like the weird things we do, what we record, you guys can check out our YouTube channel and watch the video for this episode. And I think that's it. So we'll see you guys in one week for our biz mom episode, which is our super quick, quick tip series where we just blow your head off with a fist and in two weeks for the next full episode. Thanks Tracy.

Tracy Raftl:
yeah, thank you.

Kendra:
Talk soon. Bye.

Tracy Raftl:
Bye.

Biz Bomb – Shift Your Language But Don’t Stop Selling During This Crisis

  • Listen to us here

It’s a crazy time out there in the world right now, but it’s important to remember that every single person on the planet is connected by this. As terrifying as that may seem, there's also something that's quite amazing and beautiful about that at the same time. But in this Biz Bomb episode I’m going to be talking about how some people are shaming business owners for selling during this time and how you NEED to be selling during this time, and how you should be shifting your language to be relevant during this time.

As a business owner, this is your business, this is your livelihood, and you've probably worked super hard to get where you are now. But regardless, you've worked hard and you require marketing, selling, getting new clients to pay your bills, to make ends meet, and to support your family. So when people are out there shaming you for continuing to sell during a crisis, it might make you second guess what you’re doing and if you should in fact be selling.

I am here to tell you, YES! You should be selling right now. Not only is it your right to sell, to try to make money, to do what you need to do to move your business forward, but it is also a social and economical duty as it always is, but right now more than ever.

Here’s the thing though, you can’t simply continue what you’re doing and pretend like nothing is going on. Everyone is affected by this and so you need to shift your language and how your offer your services. Now, this doesn't mean that we're going to be using people's fears to make money because that’s not cool. What this means is you may shift your pricing, or adjust your cancellation policy. It also means you can change the way you’re marketing your online services and programs.

Tune into this Biz Bomb episode to get the low down on how you should be selling at this time.

Connect with us on social:
instagram.com/360healthbizpodcast
facebook.com/360healthbizpodcast

@kendraperryinc
@sleeplikeaboss_

TRANSCRIPTS

What's up guys, Kendra here. At the time of this recording we are going through a super crazy time in this world right now, I think everyone is well aware of that. It's actually amazing to imagine that everyone in the world is going through the same thing right now in one way or another, and I'm not sure there's ever really been a time in recent history where we've all been able to connect on the same thing. So as maybe terrifying as that may seem, there's also something that's quite amazing and beautiful about that at the same time. Now, in this Biz Bomb episode, I want to address something that I've been seeing online and something that might be causing you to feel a little bit paralyzed right now. So there has been some people ... and maybe you've seen this, who've been actually shaming online entrepreneurs about selling during a time of crisis. They're saying, "How could you sell right now? We are going through a global crisis, this is not the time to sell." And maybe that's affecting you right now.

Maybe you are thinking, "Oh my God, should I be selling right now? Is this the time to sell?" Maybe you have a launch planned in the next week or two and you're thinking, "Should I just postpone the launch? Should I just offer my services for free?" Right? You might be wondering, "Is it shameful? Should I feel guilty to even be doing this right now?" And I totally empathize if you're feeling that way. This is a crazy thing, something that none of us have ever experienced in our lifetime and we don't really know how we should act. But this is what I have to say about that, these people who are shaming online business owners for continuing to sell and launch during this global crisis, they haven't really thought it through. As a business owner, this is your business, this is your livelihood, and you've probably worked super hard to get where you are now or you're just starting. But regardless, you've worked hard and you require marketing, selling, getting new clients to pay your bills, to make ends meet, and also to serve your family, to be able to support your family or whatever.

And it's really important that we make sales right now, not only for us, but for the economy. Our ability to make money may ... Excuse me, our ability to make money will determine the choices that we make with our purchasing behavior. If I stopped making money, I'm going to be canceling a lot of my subscriptions, I'm going to stop doing certain things that I don't consider essential and other business owners will suffer as the result of me making less money. So in a time of global crisis, in a time where our economy is going through a fucking thing, it's actually our social duty to sell. If you can make money right now, you need to make money because the economy actually depends on it. What if every single online business owner in the world was just like, "It's sleazy for me to be selling right now." And we all just stopped? What do you think that would do to the economy? Not good, right? So I just want you to really reframe this.

Not only is it your right to sell, to try to make money, to do what you need to do to move your business forward, to be able to support yourself and your family. But it is also a social and economical duty as it always is, but right now more than ever. So please make that mindset shift and please just ignore people who are saying that because they don't get it, they haven't thought it through. They're coming from a place of fear. Now, what that doesn't mean is that obviously we're not going to be using people's fears to make money. We don't want to leverage people's fears because that's not cool. But we can still show people that what we offer is very important during these times, and that might mean that we have to shift our messaging. In fact, over the weekend I went through and I updated a lot of my sales pages, sales emails to reflect the current global climate. So, just as an example for one of my upcoming courses, one of the benefits of going through it is that you can make more money to travel the world.

Didn't really feel relevant right now, so I took that out. And also it's really important that you show people why is what you offer important right now. For example, I'm about to launch a course in how to launch an online group coaching program. So I've really shifted my language to tell people like, "Wow, what a great time to launch an online coaching program. How many people are online? They're looking for things to do, they're looking for things available in online formats, and really this is the perfect time to do it." So I've shifted my language so that people understand that even though they feel uncertain and they're going through this time of fear, that it's still important that they move their business forward and set themselves up for success in the future. Because guys, this is not permanent. This is not our permanent state of being, this is going to pass. We don't know how long it's going to pass. We could be in it for a few weeks, a few months, maybe longer.

I don't have those answers for you, but what I know is that at some point we're going to get through this, and so you don't want to go making these fear-based decisions in your business that are going to screw you in the long haul. You need to keep pushing forward. This is why we are entrepreneurs, because we have the ability to adapt, because we are resourceful, because are resilient and we will get through this. So do not make longterm decisions for a short-term situation because it is short-term, that I can guarantee. Now, like I said, we may have to adjust our messaging and that's cool. We may have to adapt our products or services. Maybe what we're offering is no longer relevant, but we can adapt it in some way that is. We may decide not to raise prices on certain things. Again, that depends. It depends on your niche and who you're talking to. Me personally, I'm in an onboarding period right now with my graduate membership for my HTMA Course and I was going to raise the price and I decided not to.

And instead, I offered everyone a free month into the program. Because really, I don't want people to not come in because they're freaking out about money right now. And what I hope is that they're going to come in, they're going to get their free month, they're going to binge the content, they're going to get to experience that community and they're going to hopefully continue to stay in. So it's maybe a short-term income loss for me right now, but possibly I'll get more members in the long run, there's a strategy there. And it may be that you have to offer more payment plans. We do have to adapt. We do have to adjust right now and that's really important, but you just need to figure out how you need to do it. You can still sell right now, you need to sell. You just need to be sensitive and compassionate in your marketing, and you need to talk about it. We can't just talk about our business and our products and our services totally oblivious and totally ignoring what is actually going on right now. We can't.

We do have to address it with our audience, but you get to choose how you talk about it and you get to choose how it's going to come into your content. And if you need to, survey your audience and ask them what they want from you. Do they just want you to go ahead with business that's usual or do they want you to address the current situation and give them strategies for right now. Now, I know my audience are business owners. They're freaking out about their businesses, the economy, is this going to affect their ability to make money? So for my audience, I know they want me to talk about it, but your audience may not. And so it's really important that you figure out what they need right now. But the overall message here, the most important thing, guys, is that it is your right to sell and it is your duty to sell. So get out there and sell. If you have a launch coming up, go ahead with it. If you are planning a workshop, if you're planning to launch a course, whatever it is, do it.

Go through with it, just adjust your messaging accordingly. Okay, guys, I hope you found this helpful. If you are listening on your smartphone right now, do make sure to screenshot it, share it to your Instagram stories and mention at 360. Help this podcast, and let us know what your biggest take homes were. Thank you so much for tuning in and we will have a full episode for you in one week.

How Abundance Mindset Can Save Your Business with Viola Hug

  • Watch us here
  • Listen to us here

With many new business owners, we look to external validation to determine our success. Did we make money? How many likes on the ‘gram did we get?

So if we aren’t getting those things, how can one be have an abundance mindset without having an abundant amount of stuff (and money)?

In today’s episode of the 360 Health Biz Podcast, Viola Hug joins us to discuss the requirement of an abundance mindset in order to be successful in your business. She is a “started from the bottom now I’m here” type of story where she and her husband had nothing, but after adopting an abundance mindset and being grateful for the things they had, they flourished in their business.

In this episode, we discuss:
- how sometimes you need to hit rock bottom in order to grow
- how to have an abundant mindset when you don’t have abundance
- you may have scarcity mindset even when you have all the things you want
- self awareness is our biggest tool
- getting your power back
- do you want to believe your clients can’t afford you?

There are so many juicy & inspiring things said in this episode, we are going to have quotes for weeks! But we will leave you with this one from the episode “your energy which then changes who you attract because disempowered energy attracts disempowered energy”.

Viola Hug is an intuitive coach, author, podcaster, and the creator of the Abundant Babes brand. She coaches spiritual entrepreneurs who desire it all in life, into their next level of fulfilment, joy, alignment and wealth. Viola and her husband travelled the world full-time for 2 years before settling in Canada, while she built and grew her multiple-six-figure business online. She runs live online programs, masterminds, and she also takes on high-level one-on-one clients. She hosts a successful podcast called Abundant Babes, and is the author of the Amazon Best Seller “You are an Abundant Babe.”

Get Viola’s Freebie: https://violahug.com/#freebie

instagram.com/violahug/
facebook.com/groups/AbundantBabesCommunity/

Connect with us on social:
instagram.com/360healthbizpodcast
facebook.com/360healthbizpodcast

instagram.com/kendraperryinc
instagram.com/sleeplikeaboss_

TRANSCRIPTS

Christine:

Hello everyone and welcome to the 360 Health Biz Podcast, and today there is [Mary Round 00:00:07]. We do have our wonderful, pretty, and beautiful, and smart Canadian Kendra Perry, the co-hostess with the mostest. You have my humble self, Christine Hansen, live from Luxembourg. And we have a beautiful guest today which is Viola Hug, is that it? No?

Viola:

Yes.

Christine:

Yes. You have the best name in the world. I just have to read it again.

Viola:

It is the best name. Thank you.

Christine:

Viola and then the surname is Hug, literally like a huge.

Viola:

Literally, yeah.

Christine:

We're really excited to be talking to you. So Kendra is going to present Viola a little bit more in detail. And it's a topic that we both love to talk about but we haven't done it in detail yet on the podcast. So listen carefully.

Kendra:

Yeah, so really excited to talk to Viola today. She is an intuitive coach, author, podcaster, and the creator of the Abundant Babes brand. She coaches spiritual entrepreneurs who desire it all in life into their next level of fulfillment joy, alignment, and wealth. Viola and her husband traveled the world full time for two years before settling in Canada. Yes! Another Canadian. I'm from Canada too. This is awesome.

Kendra:

While she built and grew her multiple six figure business online, she runs live online programs, masterminds, and she also takes on high-level one to one clients. She hosts a successful podcast called Abundant Babes, which I'm going to subscribe and listen to right after this podcast recording, and is the author of the Amazon best seller, You Are An Abundant Babe. Viola, where are you from?

Viola:

I'm Canadian actually, originally. But I've lived very many places and when I was 16, I moved to New Zealand which is where I was mainly living until a few months ago.

Kendra:

Where were you born? Where did you grow up?

Viola:

I was born in BC but I mostly lived in Nova scotia.

Kendra:

Where in BC? I'm in BC, I'm just dying here.

Viola:

So I left when I was 10 days old. So I don't have a lot of history in BC. But just outside of Vernon.

Kendra:

Outside of where, sorry?

Viola:

Vernon.

Kendra:

Vernon?

Viola:

Yeah.

Kendra:

My parents live there. This is great.

Viola:

It's such a small world.

Kendra:

It's such a small world. Yeah, my parents live there. I'm in Nelson, BC. I love BC. But I just love the Canadian connection. I get excited to talk to people ... We're so happy you're here.

Christine:

I don't feel excluded at all, that's fine.

Viola:

Okay. It's totally cool.

Christine:

Right, now getting over my small-minded mindset, see the [inaudible 00:02:36] that I made here. Viola, tell us a little bit, you are in a field, you know, Abundance Babe, all of that mindset stuff, how on earth did you get in there? I think it's so fascinating to hear when people actually realize that there was such a thing.

Viola:

It is such an interesting question because I feel like I grew up always knowing that this possible. Like I remember when I was 11, I tried to convince my mom I was witch and I could move things with my mind. And when she [crosstalk 00:03:07]

Christine:

Really?

Viola:

... then I threatened to run away. I couldn't move things with my mind but I was very convinced I had to power to if I wanted to. And I always felt like I had this little inner knowing. And when I was younger, I felt like it was this secret. I was like, "I can do anything that I want in this lifetime, I just know I can." So I was little bit entrepreneurial and adventurous when I was a kid, but then as life happens, you kind of let that get squashed out of you. And I also had a pretty hard time in my mid-teens with my dad getting sick and passing away of cancer. And then that lead to grief and it lead to a lot of other things that were just not a very pretty time of my life, but definitely a transformational time of my life that planted a lot of seeds that then later blossomed into epic-ness in my life which I'm grateful for.

Viola:

But then, of all things, I decided to do a Bachelor of Science.

Christine:

Sure, that makes total sense.

Viola:

I know. I was like, "What could I do that is completely opposite to who I am? Let's do science." Although I must say, I loved it. I did human nutrition and biochemistry and all these really interesting things and it was great. But I left, on the other hand, with this one side of me that was very scientific and one side of me that was like, "I still have this feeling that we're magical."

Christine:

"There's more to this story." Yeah.

Viola:

Yeah. Little seeds that were planted along the way were things like I watched the movie The Secret and I was like, "That's cool." But it planted a little seed. And then I heard about things like the Japanese water experiments where they put love and hate on the outside of a water bottle and it changes the molecules of the water and it was these little things that were slowly developing my mind. And as I started getting out into the working world and I started becoming an entrepreneur and I started just all of these things. I was very much like, "Oh, well I have to know the right strategy and I have to know the right success tips," and all these things which are true to some extent, but it's like I went all in one that side. And when, after five years of, quote unquote "struggling" in that space, I was still struggling.

Viola:

I was like, "Maybe there's more to this." I talk about how I really, really tapped into the Abundant Babes vibe and brand was that through my story of my financial struggles because I was in such a hard financial place that everything up to that point of my life had been ... Like success for me was external validation, it was that I did my degree, it was that I was entrepreneur, that I made this much money, that I had a nice car. Those were the things I thought made me successful. And no wonder they always felt empty and there was always something else I needed to run for.

Viola:

But then, at this point, we were in so much debt, my husband and I. We were just like such a mess. We were making no money and we had nothing really left externally to prove that. I couldn't say I was successful with what I was going because I really wasn't. I wasn't making money. We had to sell all our shit.

Christine:

It's like, "I'm abundant. Yay."

Viola:

Yeah, and then that's when this really started to hit me is I started thinking about money and wealth and abundance and all these things and I'm like ... and long story short, what happened ... I know this has already been a long story, but long [crosstalk 00:06:34]

Christine:

We love stories.

Kendra:

Do tell.

Christine:

Tell all!

Viola:

I started to see that the more that I shifted my internal relationship with this idea of abundance, and the more that I allowed myself to think, "What if I'm actually already abundant?" And it was a very deep thought. I was like, "What if I'm really already there?" And I started to look for that in my life and I started to see how I was abundant. I had an incredible partner who just loved me so much and I'd go out for a coffee with my friend and she would pay for my coffee. And this and this and that would happen and it was all these little things that I started to appreciate. And the more that I tapped into that feeling.

Viola:

I remember the first time that I truly felt what I would describe abundant and successful in my life, I was sitting in the backyard on a blanket watching a move on a laptop with my husband because we couldn't afford date night but that was closest things that we could create for ourselves and it was just everything. It was the stars. It was the cuddles. It was the pillows. It was everything. And I was like, "If you can feel this good just in this moment, then what else is available?" And then from there, it was like that's when things really started to shift in my physical life from there.

Viola:

And then I launched my coaching business and then suddenly we're making enough to decide to ... Well, I say making enough, one month. We had a good month. And we were like, "Let's travel the world." But it was a different feeling at this point because now I wasn't being lead by what I thought was a good idea anymore, I wasn't being lead by any external idea of what I needed to achieve to feel a particular way, I was fulling being lead by this internal guidance system. This full feeling that I know I'm taken care of, that I know that I have incredible things to offer and to experience and I followed that feeling. And suddenly then my business blossoms and all these incredible things happen and here I am two years later pinching myself and I'm like, "Oh my Gosh, this is actually my life."

Christine:

Yeah, I love this story because I think a lot of people have a similar one in terms of that sometimes you really need to hit rock bottom or have this wake up moment where you stop comparing. I love that you said, it needs to be that much money, or it needs to be this car, but actually to realize what is the feeling. And that is what is so hard to describe I find. Especially for people who are in the space just before hitting rock bottom. And I don't want anyone to needing to be in that space because it's not fun. So if we can avoid it, all the better. So my question, I don't know if there's an answer to it, it might be rhetorical, is: do you think it's possible to get there without ever having had that, "Fuck, money is not there, I'm dying," shit moment?

Viola:

Yeah, you know what, I think it is. I think it's interesting because we are a little bit tapped into this mindset that it needs to be the rock bottom. Because when you're on rock bottom, you have something to push off. And sometimes we need that, because sometimes that internal drive, that energy inside of us is just not there all the way. Like it hasn't gotten bad enough that we're really willing to do what it takes. This is the craziest thing, willing to do what it takes isn't always this big, big scary thing. It's the scariest thing of all which is watching your mind every moment of the day, it is being able to pick yourself up and call yourself out when you're choosing to see through that mindset rather than choosing to tap into gratitude in a moment. And that's really the scariest thing because it's so simple and it's so available.

Christine:

I agree. And that's why I think so many people do everything else first. Like throw money at yet another program or yet another tech thing, because that's something that's tangible. And if you just tell them, "Be at peace and just think abundantly." They're just like, "What the fuck? That's not even real." And there's this person promising me to make six figures in three months is really because [crosstalk 00:10:42]

Viola:

It's that process. Let's go.

Christine:

And it's so weird, right? But I get it. I was exactly the same, spending tons of money and stuff, until I got quiet, [inaudible 00:10:52].

Viola:

Yeah, it's so easy to think that you don't have it, you must be missing something, you most not know something. Because that's what I feels like. I saw this graphic on Instagram yesterday and it was something like, "The creator said that they wanted to put something on earth that people who have able to find when they were ready that would give them away the secret that they can actually create whatever they want in their life." And then the hawk, was like, "I'll fly Into the moon." And they were like, "No, one day they'll discover it on the moon." And then, "We'll put it on the bottom of the Ocean." "No, they'll swim that far down." "We'll put it into the plains of the earth." "No, they'll dig into the earth." And then someone was like, "Put it inside of them."

Christine:

And they'll never find it.

Viola:

Exactly.

Christine:

It's right there.

Viola:

It is! It is right three. I joke around a lot. If I were myself giving myself advice, three years ago, I would be punching myself in the face like, "no, no I've already tried gratitude okay. I've already done that."

Christine:

I know.

Kendra:

And it's hard. I mean, if your bank account is zilch and reddish, it's like, "I'm fucking abundant and I do trust the fucking process." It's like, "I'm really grateful." It's hard. It's very, very hard.

Viola:

It is. And I think that's sometimes what we have to have compassion for ourselves for. It's not going to feel easy, it's not going to feel nice, but it's life, if we really just allow ourselves to go all in on that and say, "Okay, what would happen if not only I just sat in the morning and listed ten things I was grateful for". But I went through my day and I actually acted as if I really was grateful for those things through my day. If I could say that I'm abundant because when I went to the grocery store, the food was on special, like on special price, and that's abundance because, hello, I don't know if you've realized but that is money saved. And pretty much very time you go to the grocery store, there's food on sale.

Kendra:

It's true though, yeah. It's totally. It's really interesting because I've definitely been in that scarcity mindset and I see a lot of our clients and people, like some of my audience, they're like, people can't afford the cost of my services, there's not enough, there's competition. And I think it's hard to even recognize that you're in that state. Are there certain ways that people can tell that, "Oh shit, I'm actually not in an abundant state, I'm in this scarcity mindset."

Viola:

I think this is a really good question because as well scarcity mindset comes up in so many areas. Sometimes it's not actually because you have no money in your bank account. You have the money in your bank account, but how you feel about the money in your bank account's the problem.

Kendra:

Amen! I'm still guilty of this. I have tons of money right now, but I'm so freaking scared of investing [crosstalk 00:13:50]

Viola:

What if it stops? What if you don't make any more money?

Kendra:

Exactly. What if I invest it and it's then locked in and I can't get it, and I'm going to die under a bridge, which is ridiculous.

Viola:

Honestly, where your mind takes you.

Kendra:

It is. So I do observe it. That's difference. Instead of believe, now I'm just like, "Shut the fuck up. It's bullshit." But it's still [inaudible 00:14:13] though.

Viola:

Yeah, in terms of telling it as like ... I think self awareness is our biggest tool and it is one of those things where it just has to happen enough that either we notice or someone points it out to us. And I think that's the good thing about having a coach or working in a program or something where if someone can mirror back to your own shit. I just got off a call with my coach right before this, and I'm like, "Blah, blah, blah," and she's like, "Do you realize what you're saying?" I'm like, "Oh shit, you're right. This is bullshit. Don't worry. Nevermind."

Viola:

So self awareness is definitely key. Where I would say is if you feel that there is an area in your life that you're struggle. I'm not getting the clients that I want. Other people my industry, they're getting all the clients. They're better. They have better ricing than me. OR all of the clients that I get, or potential clients, don't have the money to pay for my services. When we notice that there's an area of our life where we're really feeling that struggle, then that is where we need to do the work, right. Because it's so simple. Yes, there's things we can do tangibly to change. But when we're in the right mindset, those things become more clear, right.

Viola:

So keep this in mind. If you say, "My clients can't afford me." Is that something you want to believe? Honestly, do you want to keep believing that? Cool. Then go for gold. But I'm going to guess, no, you don't want to keep believing that in which case what would you rather believe? "Well, I would rather believe that the right clients will pay me. That's that." Okay, cool. So if you start leaning in on to that belief and start saying, "If I believe that the right clients will pay me, then what if I believed in the person a little bit more that said, "I can't afford it." And I thought to myself, "I remember a time that I didn't think that but when I really wanted it, I wanted it." So I believe if they really want this and they're going to be the best client for me, they're will find a way to do it." And then we just say, "Okay, well when you're ready, I'll be here sending you good vibes."

Kendra:

Exactly. I think that's so important to have this distance, not to take it personally, and just trust that the vibe is there, it's on its way, and just to have this ... It's not the distance, what's it called ... this dis-attachment in a way.

Viola:

Yeah, that's so it. And then it's like maybe sometimes when we're experiences quote unquote "lack" in an area, it's also because we're deflecting our own stuff. So sometimes when we're receiving clients that are saying they can't afford it, there's an area of our life where we're not actually in integrity with clients quote unquote "affording" us. So many it's a chance for us to look at ourselves.

Viola:

I always say there's the trigger. Like, what's triggering you about it? Where in your life is this possibly showing up as well? And then we're also are you choosing to believe that? Because when we talk about manifestation, and love, attraction, all of these kinds of things, it's like energy, attracts like energy. And the way that we manifest, the channels that we manifest through, which we're always manifesting because our life is an act of manifestation, are the areas of least resistance.

Viola:

The areas with least resistance are the areas that we hold the most belief in. For example, when it comes money, sometimes people say to me, "Oh, I'm not making any money." I'm like, "Well, that's not true. Where are you getting your money from?" And they'll be like, "Well, my job but I'm not making any money in my business." I'm like, "Okay, so you believe it's easier to make money in a job than in your business?" "Well, yeah. Because I just go to my job and then I get paid." "Okay, well what about your business? Okay, well maybe now what we need to work on is your belief that you can actually make money in your business, right?"

Kendra:

Yes.

Viola:

It shows you. If we started to look at our challenges and say, "These are just showing us the areas that we can up level." Then we would have a completely different relationship with those quote unquote "hardships".

Kendra:

Great. I love this. I think we've mentioned this book so many times and it's just been such an eye-opener for me, and it's the Margaret Lynch, Tapping Into Wealth book. And I love it because it's not just the philosophy of abundance or law of attraction, but what she points out is, really astutely I find ... is that sometimes you don't know the mind fucks that you have in your head. So you inadvertently want to, obviously, attract money. So it's the law of attraction. So if I'm attracting money, then everything's fine. But inadvertently, you're actually really scared of money or you have all of these, she calls it a set point. There's only a certain amount that's safe for me.

Kendra:

In the book, she asks several questions that really point you towards those blind spots that you might have with money. And I think that's what a couch usually does one on one. So I would be really interested, when you work with someone, how do they change? How does their business change? Because I think that's sometimes when I tell people I have a coach that I work with. I do have a coach that I work with just on this, on my mindset, they're like, "What do you mean?" So how do you explain this?

Viola:

I think this is one of the hardest things to explain because I think there's rock bottom until life is good is one thing, and then good to great is a completely different game. At the beginning, you're like, "How do I make money? Can I even make money?" And then you're making money and you're like, "Oh shit, can I maintain this?" And how do you grow from this? Once it's no longer a need, once it's no longer out of desperation, like, "I have to pay my bills," or, "I need this money because I no longer want to work in a job." And it's suddenly like, now you have money. Then you have to build from a place of desire. Then it's what are you capable of? What's your potential? It's a completely different energy.

Viola:

And I feel the same thing happens when you work with coaches. Like when I first hired a coach it was because I was like, "she must know something that I don't know. She's going to teach me how to sell better. She's going to teach me how to do this." And although that was definitely a part of my experience with my coach at the start, what I've noticed is the more I've grown, it actually turned into something different. Now I don't need a coach. I desire to be in that energy, because there is magic that happens when you are let into the energetic bubble of some who has a mindset that is so powerful or has a business or a wealth set point, a money set point, that is at a higher level than what you have. Even being in that energy, you're going to calibrate up. That is science.

Kendra:

I just think it's so fascinating what people believe. It's like these stories that they tell themselves and they don't even realize it's a story and it's not true. And I see it a lot with when we're talking about money, the people in my city, they just don't prioritize health. They can't afford the cost of working with me. And you're like, "So you've seen inside all of their bank accounts?" And they're like, "Well, no." I'm like, "So how the fuck do you think you know that?" And they're like, "Oh, yeah." I think people get so attached to their stories, they have no idea. And that's what's so great about a coach right, because they do call you on your shit.

Kendra:

And I do love that idea of being in the realm of someone who has a higher money set point, because you start being successful in your business, you're like, "Sweet, I did six figures." And they're like, "But can you do more? You could do seven, you could do multiple six figures with ease." I think so many of us are just used to the people say, "That's just a one-shot." And having people around you who say, "No. There's so much money in the world and you can make us much as you want." Even when I tell people sometimes, they just look me like I'm crazy. "What do you mean?" And just like, "Why not?" And they can't answer it because obviously there's no reason why they couldn't. So I love that. I think it's necessary too.

Viola:

Yeah, exactly. And then there's game and then there's the whole aspect of like it can collapse the time around what you can create for yourself. I don't believe anybody needs a coach, I really don't. Because we are all magical fucking whatever, beings. And we can do the thing on our own. But it's, again, what energy are you calibrating to in your life. And then two, it is harder to see things when you're so close to them because it's your own stuff. So when you have someone who can mirror it back to you, you're able to one, if you're going through something that's hard, go through it a lot quicker. Like you said before, you could be sitting for months with this belief that nobody in your town can afford your services and then you could have one conversation with your coach and be like, "Oh wait, maybe this isn't actually true." And completely can shift your own energy, therefor it highlights where you can grow, and then you can grow. And it's just awesome.

Kendra:

Exactly, the potential. I mean, it's not even potential, it's just your birthright. That's why we grow on earth. It's just normal. That's what we're here for. We're here to be happy. We're here to be abundant. That's just normal. But indeed, it's the blind spots, and they're called blind spots for a reason, it's because you can't see them. You do need someone else to point them out to you. And I agree from birth, from being, you don't need a coach. It's just that we do carry all this crap with us. So you do need someone who listens to you and who can figure out what your fake truth is, so to say.

Viola:

And that's what I think is so powerful, though, is when you can tap into realizing that having a coach or whatever actually comes from a desire energy. You can really tap into that. It's like, "I don't need them, I desire to walk alongside a coach. I desire to be elevated by this person."

Kendra:

You just gave me my tagline for my business vaycay to Bali. "I desire." But it's true. It's very, very true. Just writing it down. So I think it makes sense for people who are ready, they will hear that spark. But let's talk about money. So when you start working with someone and they do come to you because of money struggles and it's this last resort kind of thing, how does it translate? What are the kind of stories that you can tell us about how this shift has helped them to actually convert.

Viola:

I think the biggest part about this is, I really loved the idea that there's both strategy things like that we can do, but then there's the energy work behind it. Because for example, one of the things that is so simple around money that really can shift your relationship with money is tracking your money and most people don't, especially women. Because it's just like, "Scary! I don't want to look at it." Like, "I'd rather turn a blind eye." Which I did for so many years. And then it's just like, you might hear someone talk about it and be like, "Oh tracking your money's really important, and where your intention goes, it expands, so as you put more energy and focus on your money then you can expand your energy around money." Yes, that's true, but your energy behind it is actually what makes a difference.

Viola:

The tracking the money is one thing but tracking the money and the energy of, "Oh, I have to track my money now because they said I would make more money if I did this." It's every different.

Kendra:

Yes. I totally believe so many people do. I did. And I was like, "Okay, now I'm tracking money, so obviously now it's all going to happen."

Viola:

Well that's exactly, it's not that I wasn't grateful for things, but its like even when I first was hearing about gratitude practice, I didn't get it. I was like, "Okay, I'm going my things I'm grateful for in the morning, where is my cheque in the mail."

Kendra:

Exactly. I was grateful, why am I not winning the lottery right now? Exactly, that's exactly it.

Viola:

Yeah. And so it's also got the energy in which you do it. So, it's like when someone comes into a space, let's say where I run a money program which I see this a lot. People join the money program, they do what they can and they invest, and they show up and then they're like, "Okay, now I'm really scared. Now, what about my rent next month? And what about this and what about that?" And it's like, yeah, I get it. But it's like, at the same time, as you change the actual way that you're treating money in your life. Because having consciousness around money is important, knowing your motives to why you buy. Like people who over spend money and they're just like, "I don't know, my credit card just maxed out." Hello, this is me in the past.

Viola:

But a lot of people, they're just like, "I don't know. It just did. I don't know what I spent it on." That usually comes from actually a disconnect between why you're buying things and usually you're trying to fill a gap, right, with that. So let's say you are going out and then you bought some clothes. You didn't buy the clothes because it was an intentional decision. It felt like the right align thing to do for you, you bought it because you felt like you'd feel more validated in the latest trend clothes or because you were emotional and it just felt like you needed to get your mind off of it because you didn't want to deal with the emotions.

Kendra:

I do this all the time. I love spending money. I'm like, "Amazon, what can I get in two days?"

Christine:

I know. I did it on [inaudible 00:27:39] I just literally caught myself browsing and seeing what I could out into my shopping cart. I took it back out, I have to say, because I was like, "Christine, stop this stupid thing, you don't need collagen thing." You know, it's like, amazing the skin. I literally thought, "No, stop this right now."

Viola:

So it's like at the same time that we're starting to take different actions, like we're tracking our money, we're being more aware of how we're spending, we're also starting to shift our energy around it. So one, the more awareness that we have, the more actually power we take back. Because I think one of the biggest problems is we're consistently giving our power away. When we say, "I can't afford it." Or we say, "People can't afford my services." What we're actually saying is the power is outside of us. We're saying that, "I can't afford it because there's a power greater than me that's deemed me unable to afford and the powers outside of me, I can't have money, because that person can't pay." It's like we're constantly giving our power away, we're constantly sitting in this space of victim hood and blame. And I know that sometimes that feels a little bit ouch on the ego, but it's true. It's just the way it is.

Viola:

And so we sit in this space and it's like, once we start observing that, we start taking our power back because we're like, "I feel like I'm not going to buy the chocolate today because I have three blocks at home." It's that kind of vibe. And we start getting this power back. But then at the same, as we're energetically working on it, as we're energetically starting to notice how our relationship with money is changing. Now, suddenly, when we check our bank accounts, we actually feel like, "Oh, I feel pretty neutral, now. I don't feel scared or terrified or whatever." And then suddenly you're starting noticing, "Oh my God, now I feel gratitude when I look at my bank account, even at my credit card debt. What's happening?" It's like energetically, you're shifting.

Viola:

So then what happens is how you speak about your offer suddenly changes. The belief you have In other people's power to also be in their power around money changes. The way that you even create offers and price your offers is no longer, "What do I think my clients can afford?" But what level of transformation do I want to offer my clients.

Kendra:

Preach.

Viola:

Right, so then it changes everything about your energy which then changes who you attract because disempowered energy attracts disempowered energy. Empowered, lit-up, confident energy attracts people who are ready to make a decision in that energy. So, it's kind of like a no-brainer at that point that your life changes.

Kendra:

Yeah, it's true. And I can totally vouch for this. It's crazy, it sounds weird, and it's intangible but anyone listening and knowing there's a piece missing the please investigate this.

Viola:

It's intangible because I feel like the changes are so minute at a time, but it's also, if you think about it scientifically or neurologically or whatever, like brain-wise, it's also activating the reticular activating system. The reticular activating system's the part of the brain that when you say, "I'm going to buy a new car." And suddenly you start seeing the car everywhere. That's the part of your brain that's being activated. Essentially, it filters everything you see. Because the amount of information we see a day is just crazy, crazy, crazy. And this filters it out to that you only notice seven to eight of the most important things that your brain thinks is the most important based on what you've told it is important.

Viola:

And when we're in a space where we think that we don't have enough money, that we don't have enough clients, and everyone else is better than me, your reticular activating system is actually set up to look for proof of that. So, that's what you see more of. Then when you start changing that and you're like, "Wait a minute. What if people actually really do love my stuff?" And, "What if people actually can afford me?" Then suddenly you're celebrating your one client way more than you every thought. And I'm just like, "As you should be, because it's kind of rude if you're not celebrating what [crosstalk 00:31:36]

Kendra:

Yeah, agreed. Agreed.

Viola:

Like, let's be honest, I'd be pissed if my coach was like, "Oh yeah, but I only have Viola." I'd be like, "Rude."

Kendra:

"Excuse you."

Viola:

"No you don't." So actually on a scientific level it makes complete sense how this actually then changes your actions because then you're feeling different about it. It's the circumstance, then your thoughts about it, then that generates the feeling which generates your action which generates the result. And when you change your thoughts about it, it will change the whole cycle.

Kendra:

Right. You're very magical. I love this. Thanks for the science bit. I love that kind of stuff.

Christine:

Yeah, bring in the science for our nerdy audience.

Viola:

Yeah, but if you do like the science, I always recommend Joe Dispenza's book: Breaking The Habit Of [crosstalk 00:32:25]

Kendra:

I'm obsessed with Joe Dispenza right now. I want to go to one of his retreats because I feel like so many people have been to his retreats by now that I'm like, "I feel I miss out." But I really want to go too.

Viola:

We should go to one in some random place.

Kendra:

We should. We should.

Viola:

But you have to travel, Kendra. You do know that.

Kendra:

Well, I'll go to one in North America. I'm fine with North America. I just don't want to be jumping time zones.

Viola:

I'm sure he'll do them in Canada too. I can come to Canada.

Kendra:

They're normally in California and stuff.

Viola:

But if you don't know him. The first book I read of his was Breaking The Habit Of Being Yourself. And I just loved it. So I think that's maybe a good one to start, just from personal experience. But for those who are skeptical about this and the way I was, that was what actually made me believe in a way. For me, as well, like I said, I've always had this part I'm like, "I'm sure we're magic." But also, "Prove it."

Kendra:

Yes, exactly.

Viola:

Now I've definitely tapped into surrender a lot more, because I've also gotten to the point now where I'm like, "Why do I always make things hard for myself?" We know WiFi works, I don't need to fucking see a manual on how WiFi signals through the air for me to use my phone, you know what I mean? I'm just going to use it. It makes my life easier and so does this energy work. I did have that skeptical time but now I've just kind of been like, "Whatever, it makes life easier to believe this, whether or not it's true."

Kendra:

It works. It just works. It's so weird, but it really works. And there's just so much more proof in your life when you sit back and they just happen. You can't explain it. It's just believe it, dude.

Viola:

Yeah. That's what I say too, is just have fun with it, just play. Well, what if you could just go through your day to day and notice one way that you're abundant that you may have not usually picked up. And then it's like, "Yeah, I found a penny on the floor." Well, apparently they don't have pennies in Canada anymore. I say apparently because I never have cash.

Kendra:

I know, I don't either. When people want cash, I'm like, "What? What do you mean? I don't have 'coins'."

Viola:

My husband sold his camera and he got a 100 dollar bill and I'm so excited about it. I pressed it all flat and I'm keeping forever because it so cool and I'll put it with my crystals and attract more money. I like holding money bills but it's just like I don't really like having it for spending, but it's fun to look at.

Kendra:

Yeah, because I don't like spending them because it's just like, "Bye." And of course, I actually learned from my coach that energy that you have when you give away your money is super important actually you're just like, "You're coming back to me ten fold," or, "It's just circulating around. You're going to your next person where the next bill's coming to me." And that was also something that I realized because I was always, you know, when I did have cash and then my wallet was empty, I'd be like ... Which is bullshit obviously.

Viola:

But that's that point that you just said about your energy, for anyone listening, keep this in mind for when you spend on your daily, like when you spend on your rent, remember that you're spending because you live in a house or an apartment or whatever. You're not just spending money to someone who's collecting it in a basket. You live somewhere. But then as well, I think it's really important to be intentional around investing with this. If you're going to invest, you can feel the fear and be scared and do the whole dance between, "Should I do it, shouldn't I?" But then when you decide to do it, be intentional. I don't know, put on some music, dress up nice, out your hand on your heart, just really be intentional about how you send that money off. Because I really feel like that makes a difference.

Viola:

And one of the affirmations that I love with spending, even just at groceries stores and stuff is, "Thank you, thank you, thank you. There is always more where that came from."

Kendra:

Exactly, and it's true. Agreed. Agreed.

Christine:

This is amazing. Kendra, do you have anymore question?

Kendra:

I don't. I just love it. Because I think a lot of us, we were trying to change our external world, hoping that's going to shift our internal world, but really if we focus on our internal world, we might be complete blown away by how that shifts our exterior world. So I just love that. I just love the message in this episode.

Christine:

I agree. And isn't it interesting that very often we have these conversation with people who are at a certain level? That's really what I realized, the more successful people very often are, the more you can tentatively mention this and they're like, "Oh yeah, totally." It's weird. Where you would think, "Oh, they're so successful, they're really businessy and very smarty," And then you mention someone one Joe Dispenza and like, "Yeah, I'm their biggest fan!" And it's like, "Oh." So you do realize that very often there's this threshold. And a lot of people who are successful, they are totally [inaudible 00:37:18]. They are humbled because they understand that you don't need to understand everything. If you want to play a higher game, you need to understand that as a human being, we don't understand everything. There's so much more out there. And I think that's also a game changer, really.

Viola:

Mm-hmm (affirmative) Absolutely.

Christine:

All right. Well, Viola, you mentioned a couple of your programs already, so tell us a little bit about how people can reach out to you. You mentioned Instagram. How do they get in touch with you? Where can they stalk you? Where can they google you?

Viola:

Yes. So I love chatting with people. Connection is a really important thing for me. So Instagram, I love hanging out with my Instagram stories, I feel like I'm ridiculously embarrassing on there, but I think I'm pretty coo, too. So if you want to come hang out with me on Instagram at Viola Hug feel free to message me as well if you have any questions over anything that we talked about on this podcast. Other than that, you can find out more about my work. I have a range of different programs that I do and I also work with one on one clients, violahug.com. But seriously, feel free to reach out, I'm not going to not DM you back. If you have questions for that. And then my Abundant Babes podcast. And my Abundant Babes Facebook group as well which you can find just by searching both Abundant Babes. I think those would probably be the main ways to get in touch. And if anyone else is listening who has a podcast, I always love being interviewed on podcasts too. So, you can always feel free to reach out.

Christine:

That's such a good call to action. Very smart lady.

Kendra:

That is a good call to action. I love that. Very abundant.

Christine:

And vice versa, if you ever want to have us on your Abundant Babes podcast, we're also available.

Viola:

[inaudible 00:39:03]

Christine:

We would love that.

Kendra:

See, taking action right there.

Viola:

But for everyone listening, this is the magic. I really, really believe in the power of authentic connection and communication and all these things because cool things happen that you never would've expected.

Christine:

There we go. All right. Well, thank you Viola so much for your time. We've enjoyed this tremendously. This is of tremendous value. Even if you guys are a little bit skeptical, believe us, this is golden.

Viola:

[inaudible 00:39:39]

Christine:

So thank you so much. And all of you guys if you did enjoy this and if you enjoy Apple Podcast, please leave us a five-star review on iTunes, we really appreciate it. And we've just been told that by a lot of listeners that they enjoy what we produce, so please leave us a review so that more people can find us. Because that's what we think works for other people to find us. We're not sure. We're still figuring this out. But I think that's the best way. All right. Well, I think with that, thanks for listening and you'll hear back from us next week. Bye.

Kendra:

Bye.

Biz Bomb – Stop Waiting for Confidence to Show Up

  • Listen to us here

Welcome to your Biz Bomb episode of the 360 Health Biz Podcast where we blow your mind with a juicy topic.

Today we are talking about confidence. Putting yourself out there online in front of a bunch of strangers, can bring up a lot of insecurity and self-worth issues. And if you’re wondering how you can overcome this feeling then you will definitely find benefit to listening to this episode.

Here’s the thing – confidence is the last thing to happen when it comes to learning something new. When you're brand new to growing your business and showing up online, you probably aren't going to have confidence. Just like that old saying practice makes perfect, the more you do something, the more confidence you’ll get in doing it.

When it comes to building an online business, you’ re not going to feel confident (at first) because it's new. And guess what? This happens to ALL of us! Go to someone’s YouTube page that you look up to or their Instagram or even their first blog. If you look at their first few posts, we guarantee they are probably not very good. Heck, check out Kendra’s YouTube videos from when she started and you’ll see how her confident level has changed since then.

Tune in to hear Kendra’s real life examples of how her practice made go from timid to confident!

Connect with us on social:
instagram.com/360healthbizpodcast
facebook.com/360healthbizpodcast

@kendraperryinc
@sleeplikeaboss_

TRANSCRIPTS

Hey guys, what's up? Welcome to your Biz Bomb episode of the 360 Health Biz Podcast and today we're going to talk about something that I know you might be lacking. Confidence. I know a lot of you are struggling with confidence. The truth is, putting yourself online, out to the world, to a bunch of strangers, people you can't even physically see or touch is weird, and it can bring up a lot of insecurity, a lot of self worth issues. It can trigger that insecure high school girl in you, and a lot of us are wondering, "Well, how can I get more confidence? How can I get the confidence to put myself out on social media, to show up online, to show up on Facebook live or Instagram live." Or whatever it is. You're all wondering, "Well, what do I do to get the confidence?"

Now a big mistake that I see a lot of people make in terms of trying to gain confidence is they keep putting off showing up online, trying to wait for the confidence. So they're like, "Well, maybe I'll feel more confident after I take this other functional health course." Or maybe they'll say something like, "Well, I'll probably feel more confident on video once I get a professional video setup or whatever" So there's always something that you need or something that you want to finish and that will help you get the confidence. Not true.

Okay. So this is the thing, guys. Confidence is the last thing to happen when it comes to learning something new. It's always the last thing to happen. So in the beginning, when you're brand new to growing your business and showing up online, showing up on video, podcasting, whatever it is, you aren't going to have confidence. That confidence is just not going to be there at all. So what do you do? Because the only thing that's going to give you confidence is actually doing the thing. Unfortunately, I have no simple answer for you other than, "[inaudible 00:02:15] that sexy, get out there and do the fucking thing." The more you do it, the more you do something over and over and over and repeat something, the more confident you will feel. But confidence still will be the last thing to happen.

Let's just use soccer as an example. So let's say that I am brand new to playing soccer. I've never played soccer before, but I really want to learn how to do it. How am I going to feel confident at playing soccer? Is it going to be going and getting those super fancy soccer cleats or some better shin pads or investing in that flashy jersey? Of course not. None of those things matter. The cleats aren't going to teach me how to play soccer, that jersey is not going to do anything, and those shin pads aren't really going to do shit in terms of helping me learn how to play soccer. The only thing that is going to make me confident in playing soccer is showing up for soccer practices and going for it over and over and over again. And practice, practice, practice.

So same shit guys. When it comes to building an online business, when you're new to this, you are not going to feel confident because it's new and you're probably not even going to like it that much because you're not going to feel good at it. You're going to be like, "I'm really bad at this. I'm bad at social media. I'm bad on video." But these things aren't learned. They're not things we were born with.

You guys may have seen me on video and you might be like, "Wow, Kendra is so good on video. She can just talk and talk and talk. She can just show up and do her thing on video." This was not something I was born with, even though maybe it seems like I'm so good at it, but the thing is guys, I've been showing up on video since 2015, 2016 and I have probably showed up on video at least once a week for, what's that? Four years? It's a lot of videos. You can actually go to my Facebook page, it's Kendra Perry inc, and go to the videos tab and actually scroll down to the very bottom and look at some of those early videos and you will see that I was not confident and those videos look very different.

I remember the first time that I went live on Periscope, I don't know if you remember Periscope and maybe I'm dating myself, but this was a livestream app from before Facebook live was even available. I remember being so nervous and writing out this whole script and I can barely concentrate all day because I had butterflies in my stomach and I was just so nervous to go live on Periscope. It was such a crazy experience. When I did it, I felt so proud of myself, and I felt like that for a while. These days I can just show up on live video and talk about whatever because I;ve done it so many times. So if you truly want to feel confident showing up online, on social media, on Instagram Stories, on video, on your podcast, you have to do the thing and you have to repeat it and do it over and over and over again, and then the confidence will come.

So you will not feel confident until you do the thing so the advice I want to give you is just to keep doing it and, yes, it's going to feel uncomfortable, but if you keep doing it and you keep practicing it and you keep showing up, one day you're going to get on there, on social media, on Instagram Stories, and you're going to feel like, "I got this." And it will happen, but only if you keep showing up.

All right. I hope you found this episode helpful. This is our Biz Bomb series for those of you who are new. So every other week we post a quick tip episode to give you a super valuable business bomb tip. If you like this episode and you're listening on your iPhone right now, or your Android, make sure to screenshot the episode and share it to your Instagram Stories and tag me, Kendra Perry Inc or you can take us, 360 Health Biz Podcast, and just let us know what were your biggest take homes? What did you learn? And we'll be happy to connect with you. Have a fantastic week and we will see you next week with one of our full episodes.

Why You Should Invest In Yourself with Kristin Hartjes

  • Watch us here
  • Listen to us here

It’s hard to rationalize spending money on yourself when you’re first starting your business.  But think of it this way, if you’re not willing to put money towards yourself, what makes you think potential clients will?

In today’s 360 Health Biz Podcast episode, we have a special guest, Kristin Hartjes. Kristin started out in chiropractic school but found more interest in functional medicine. When she finished school started out in brick and mortar, coach women around emotional eating and body image. As she grew her business she eventually shifted to focus more online and mentoring other health coaches in their businesses.

Through this process, she discovered just how much mindset and investing in yourself helps you grow as a business owner and grow your business. The mindsets we particularly dived into are imposter syndrome, self-doubt and struggles with perfectionism.

We’ve discussed imposter syndrome many times, but in our discussion with Kristin, we talked about how we feel guilty or fraud-like when we charge for our services. But the example Kristin gave made a lot of sense: many people will pay $1,000 for a brand new TV – so why wouldn’t someone be willing to pay $1,000 for their health? If one’s health isn’t good, they can’t enjoy said TV anyways. Your coaching is going to change their life forever and in way more ways than spending $1,000 on a TV.

To work through these inner blockages that are holding you back from growing your business, you need to invest in yourself. This could be investing in a good therapist, a mentoring program, or you know, making sure you’re getting a regular massage to reduce stress (hello self-care)! And when you sign up for a mentorship program or a coach, this gives you a starting point of investing in yourself and getting coached and seeing what it's like to actually get coached and be on that other side so that you can see how transformational is and why it is so important.

Perfectionism is a big problem when starting your business. Yes it’s important to edit your work and make sure you’re happy with everything you’re putting out. BUT perfectionism becomes a problem when you are comparing yourself to other coaches and insist you need to do everything they are doing in order to be successful. Here’s the thing – you need to do one thing at a time. And just because something is working for someone else, doesn’t mean it’s going to work for you. When you start to do too many things you start to get overwhelmed and your work starts to get sloppy because you don’t have a focus, you don’t have a priority.

Kristin is a holistic doctor, transformational coach and business mentor. She helps new coaches overcome feelings of self-doubt, perfectionism and overwhelm so they can take courageous action in their businesses and their lives. Through practical business strategy and critical inner work, she empowers her clients to create a thriving online business so they can have the freedom they're dreaming of.

Get Kristin’s Freebie: https://kristinhartjes.com/idealclientclarity/

Connect with Kristin:

youtube.com/channel/UCCnOhdgNWcJFKLWPBEeI_JA
facebook.com/groups/796082097104741/
facebook.com/hartjesnaturalmedicine/
instagram.com/kristinhartjes/

Connect with us on social:
instagram.com/360healthbizpodcast
facebook.com/360healthbizpodcast

instagram.com/kendraperryinc
instagram.com/sleeplikeaboss_

TRANSCRIPTS

Christine:
Hello, everyone, and welcome to this brand new episode of the 360 Health Biz Podcast. Today, there's two of us, but it's not going to be my super hot, cute, intelligent, excellent hostess/co-hostess with the mostest Kendra because she's under the weather today, but I am joined full power by a super interesting woman who's going to blow your mind, so stay tuned for that.

Christine:
Now, I'm going to thank you all again for your reviews on iTunes. We've been constantly climbing up the ladder. We are so, so, so, so, so happy about the results we are getting, so thank you. Thank you so much for that. If you haven't left your review yet, please head over there right now and do so. Now, without further ado though, I'm going to introduce you to Kristin. Kristin, and I didn't ask you how I pronounce the surname, Hartjes?

Kristin Hartjes:
It's Hartjes.

Christine:
Hartjes. It sounds like Dutch, or it looks Dutch.

Kristin Hartjes:
It is Dutch, actually.

Christine:
There we go. Luxembourg and the Netherlands are family in royal bloodline kind of thing, so that's why it sounds familiar.

Kristin Hartjes:
Nice.

Christine:
Kristin is a holistic doctor, transformational coach, and business mentor, which I adore because it's a little bit what I do in terms of health and business. Helps new coaches overcome feelings of self-doubt, self-doubt, hello, been there; perfectionism, not my thing, but I know a lot of you have that; and overwhelm so they can take courageous actions in their business and their lives. Through practical business strategy and critical inner work, she empowers her clients to create a thriving online business so they can have the freedom they are dreaming of. Just in that bio alone is so much goodness that I'm just like, "Hell, yeah," so I cannot wait to dive into this. Kristin, tell me a little bit about your journey because I have an inkling that you didn't start as a business mentor.

Kristin Hartjes:
Yeah, I did not. I definitely did not. I actually am trained as a chiropractor, so I have my doctorate of chiropractic, and that is what I had gone to school for. While I was going to chiropractic school, I became very interested in nutrition, and so I started studying functional medicine, and I did a lot of additional training in that. When I graduated from chiropractic school, my main focus actually was on nutrition.

Kristin Hartjes:
I did do some chiropractic, but mostly nutrition, and I had done a few I would say internships where I was working under doctors and learning different functional medicine techniques, so really great experience, but also, the experience really showed me that I wanted to have my own business because I was very limited as far as how much income I could be making and I was having to practice in a way that under the person that I was being taught as opposed to just doing my own thing and being able to practice and work with people in the way I really wanted to. That made me want to start my own business. Originally, I had started a business, a brick and mortar, more of the traditional business working out of an office space and seeing people [crosstalk 00:03:27].

Christine:
Well, I guess that's what we're taught at school, especially I think a lot of our listeners, they are still doing the same thing. They're transitioning, or they are having the dream of doing what you did, but I guess when you are in training, they don't really talk that much about what happens afterwards, or if they do, mostly it is that traditional brick and mortar business, so it's lovely to know that you will totally understand our folks, where they're from, but yeah.

Kristin Hartjes:
Like you said, that's just kind of what I thought how you had to do it. What I started to realize is that that wasn't really my vision for myself and my life, and I didn't know where I wanted to be living, and I didn't want to build up a whole practice and then move and not be able to bring my clients or my patients with me. During this process as well, I got really interested in mindset and in coaching and started to dive down that path. I ended up moving my business online to have more freedom and flexibility and also to be able to do the coaching. I specialized in working with women around emotional eating and body image because I had been something I had struggled with as well.

Christine:
Oh, wow. When was that, more less, like into [crosstalk 00:04:47]-

Kristin Hartjes:
Yes.

Christine:
... it's always interesting to see when people jumped into the game.

Kristin Hartjes:
About six years ago.

Christine:
Yeah. Okay. Perfect.

Kristin Hartjes:
This is 2014 I think is when I [crosstalk 00:04:56].

Christine:
Yeah, similar to me. I started in 2015. Yeah.

Kristin Hartjes:
Okay. Okay. Yeah. Then from there, I really specialized in working with people that had some sort of a health background, like a lot of health coaches who were struggling with emotional eating and body image, so had gone through [crosstalk 00:05:12].

Christine:
How interesting.

Kristin Hartjes:
Yeah, because that was my experience, like even though I had done all this training in functional medicine, I had still been struggling with the body image and the emotional eating. I specifically specialized in helping people that had some sort of health or wellness background but still were struggling.

Christine:
Interesting. Do you reckon, and it's just a little bit off tangent, but do you reckon that niche found you or you found that niche?

Kristin Hartjes:
Yeah, so that's a good question. I think that's a really good question, and I think it's been a bit of a combination. I chose the niche of helping women with emotional eating and body image because of my experience with that, so whether it found me through my own experience or my life experience with it, but I decided to focus on that because I had had personal experience with it and could really relate and felt confident I could help people with that. I'd say a bit of a combination, and then specifically choosing to help women who had some sort of a health background because of my personal health background as well.

Christine:
I think that's fascinating because it's a double niche, and I love that. We are just in our mastermind honing down on niching, and we very often do have a double niche. That's what makes it super efficient, so I absolutely adore this. All right, so you knew who you wanted to work with. What happened?

Kristin Hartjes:
I was working with women doing this, and what ended up happening is because I was working with women who had some sort of a health background, a lot of them were working on building a business, and so ended up asking me a lot of business stuff, and I ended up doing mentoring around that. Really, my business just went in that direction, and I was super passionate about it. Never in a million years did I think I would be a business mentor, and it has probably been the one thing that has changed me in my life more than anything else going through the process of starting my business, which is why I now help other people do it.

Christine:
I agree. You know what made me smile instantly was that you call yourself a business mentor, which is what I do too. It's so funny because even training my trainees, it was a mentorship retreat. I tell people, "I'm a business mentor. I'm not a coach. I'm not a consultant. I will never tell you what to do per se. I will guide you, but you have to figure it out in a way." I guess that's the difference between mentoring and being a gentle guide. Of course, if they need to know the difference between wordpress.com and wordpress.org, I will tell them, but it is very different to, I guess, a program or something where you will get everything in a folder ready or a file already. It's more of a, I guess, an organic process with the person. Would you agree?

Kristin Hartjes:
Yeah. Absolutely. I actually just wrote a post today about the fact that we are creators, and I think we're creators in our business and our life and that we have to go through that process, and it's never a perfectly straight line, even if someone's telling you what to do because we all have kind of our own journey through it. You can definitely learn from other people, but you still have to go through the process and the journey of [crosstalk 00:08:39]-

Christine:
I agree.

Kristin Hartjes:
... your path within that path.

Christine:
Totally. One pet peeve that Kendra and I rave about all the time is that selling health is very different to selling money, which basically means pretty much everything in the world sells money, or beauty maybe as well, but mainly, if we look at online coaching businesses, it's mainly selling money, whether it is copywriting, it's ultimately to convert more clients to buy, business coaching is to get more clients to buy, even branding is to get more clients to buy.

Christine:
Health is very, very different, and we found that a lot of techniques or tactics and strategies that you get from business coaches don't work in our line. What are some of the things... We honed it down to different elements where we have a different sales process a little bit. We talk a little bit different to our people. What are some things, some stumbling blocks that you maybe found in your journey of wisdom that are different between selling health and selling something like a product or a money service, let's put it that way.

Kristin Hartjes:
I think this is a really good question because I think so many, even a lot of the health coaches, they always ask me, "Why did you switch from being a health coach to a business coach?" and a lot of times people think that's because you can't make money as a health coach, and that is absolutely not true at all. I think a lot of people think, "You can only make money if you're helping other people make money." It isn't true. When it comes to selling anything, whether it's helping people make money or helping people get healthier, I think the bottom line is being able to paint the picture of why someone wants that. Like what is the end result, how's it going to improve their life, and I think we can all really relate even to thinking about the fact that money without your health is pointless. You can't even enjoy the money.

Kristin Hartjes:
I think really understanding ourselves what the value is of what it is that we have to offer, like how it's going to change someone's life. For me, I even know through my own journey of the emotional eating and the body image, stuff, like that was ruining my life. It was just such a big factor that was keeping me from living a happy, fulfilling life-

Christine:
Agreed.

Kristin Hartjes:
... and so I really understand that and understand how important it is for all of us, whether it's, really, a health, like a physical health problem or a mental health problem, as I seen it... it's kind of related, but that when you can really paint a picture for people as far as how it's going to change their life when they aren't struggling with that anymore and they have the end result of what they want that you can't even put a price on most of those things.

Christine:
Totally. I absolutely agree. Here's also the linchpin in that because a lot of health coaches know, either because they have the experience themselves or because they know their niche so well, but they have so much trouble creating that pictures because they kind feel guilty that they are taking advantage of their niche. That's what I really like about you saying the self-doubt, the impostor syndrome, all of that stuff. We all have different ways of helping our clients, which would be health coaches in this case overcome this belief, but I would love to just steal some techniques from you here for our listeners how you do that and when you see, "I have a client who is fantastic, and I know she can help or he can help so many people, but that inner block is there because of guilt." Very often, I find that people who want your help are thinking it has to be selfless. "If I charge for it, I'm a bad person. Humility should be first. Helping people should be natural. How dare I put a price point on this?" How do you specifically help your people overcome this?

Kristin Hartjes:
I think it's interesting that we have this double standard for helping people as far as whether it's health coaching or coaching and that we shouldn't charge for this, when really, it's so much more valuable than everything that people spend their money on, like-

Christine:
I know.

Kristin Hartjes:
... someone could spend, let's say, $1,000, and they could go and buy a brand new TV, and we think that that's better than them spending $1,000 to... we should feel bad about it because they're going to spend $1,000 to coach with you. No, that coaching is going to change their life for ever in way more ways than them going and spending $1,000 on a TV. I just like shift people's perspective around this and be like, "It's all about seeing the value of what you have to offer as a coach and really owning that."

Kristin Hartjes:
I think recognizing that when someone is investing in themselves that they are much more likely to get really good results and to follow through and to really appreciate it as opposed to if they're getting something for free, a lot of times people don't even follow through and do the work because it's hard. Transformational work is the hardest work you could possibly do, so-

Christine:
Absolutely.

Kristin Hartjes:
... so if you're not investing anything in it, it's very easy to be like, "This is really hard, and I'm just going to give up," or, "I've hit this point, and I'm going to give up and [crosstalk 00:14:23]."

Christine:
[crosstalk 00:14:24].

Kristin Hartjes:
I even had this happen with a client yesterday. She was talking about a client of hers, and her client was like, "Oh, I'm so busy at work, and I just wanted to take a break from coaching." I'm like, "No, this is when she needs your work, like the-"

Christine:
The most.

Kristin Hartjes:
"... the most. She needs your support right now," and because she's paid money, she's going to show up and do the work and get those really good results whereas if she had been doing it for free, she would've just dropped out. She'd be-

Christine:
Forget it.

Kristin Hartjes:
... like, "I'm too busy with work. I'm just not going to do it," and then she-

Christine:
Agreed.

Kristin Hartjes:
... couldn't get those that she's signing up with you to get. I think it's just a shifter on this and really recognizing why shouldn't someone pay for your services when [crosstalk 00:15:04]-

Christine:
Totally.

Kristin Hartjes:
... life changing.

Christine:
I think Kendra and I both, we figured out that we both invested heavily in personal development in the past, and we still, we both constantly work with at least one coach, and because we, I think... well, we know the value of it, but I think we also agreed that because we did, that because we know what it feels like to have invested and to feel a little bit suffocating because you did invest so much, that is also why we understand our potential clients who are on a call with us and why we can make it clear for them what bespoke coaching means.

Christine:
We do also find that when we've interviewed people for the mastermind, for example, that people who'd never done an investment like that, they have such a hard time charging because they've never been in the situation themselves. They've never really invested in themselves. That's one thing that I'm absolutely completely convinced about. If you've never invested a certain sum into someone else, it's very difficult to expect someone else to do the same because you would always think it's crazy, but you've done it, so why would that be crazy?

Christine:
For example, my price point is between 7,000 and 10,000 a day. Is that crazy? Probably. But I've done it, and I've got amazing results, which means I don't have an issue charging those prices either because I know the results as well, but I've done it before. Is that something where you think, "Okay, a lot of the people I work with, they don't quite, would never have that perception or never had that experience of actually investing in yourself versus family, friends, family holiday, where... " but never in really in them, in their personal development?

Kristin Hartjes:
Yeah. I think this is absolutely true, and I think it's really important as a coach that you have been coached and you understand that experience, and like you said, you've actually invested in yourself. I'd say a fair number of people that I've worked with have before, have invested in themselves, have perhaps worked with the coach, but there's a number of people that haven't. I say for them, this is your starting point of investing in yourself and getting coached and seeing what it's like to actually get coached and be on that other side so that you can see how transformational is and why it is so important because I absolutely agree. If you... Why should someone... How can you stand behind saying, "You should invest in coaching because it's going to change your life," if you're not willing to do it yourself as a coach?

Christine:
Agreed.

Kristin Hartjes:
I agree too. I've seen how transformational coaching is and that is something, probably the number one thing that I will invest my money in because I see how valuable it is. From that standpoint, I can really stand behind like, "Yes, invest in coaching," like [crosstalk 00:18:04].

Christine:
Yes. No. Absolutely. It is intangible at first. It's definitely more difficult to write a science page for it, I guess, than a product, but it is, it's just super, super powerful. One of the things... We addressed self-doubt a little bit. You also talk a lot about perfectionism and overwhelm. I do... Currently, we've started our mastermind in January, end of January. You should see our Facebook group. It's nuts. Everyone wants to do everything at once. "I need my website. I need a new email marketing platform. I need a new lead magnet. I need a new landing page, I need a new eCommerce store," everything at once, so I do get it. How do you help your clients with that overwhelm and what kind of things do overwhelm them because we do have a certain type in our group, but the people who you work with might be very different, so what is your experience with that?

Kristin Hartjes:
When it comes to overwhelm, I think it's when... Overwhelm happens in the brain. We can only ever do one thing at a time. We can try to multitask, but really, you're only doing one thing at a time. You might be going back and forth, but you're really only doing one thing at a time. What I really see is that overwhelm is a brain problem, and usually, it's because we're thinking about, "I should be doing this, I should be doing that," and you're not doing one thing at a time. You're not focused on one task in front of you. I think it's so easy to get the shiny object syndrome where you're like-

Christine:
Oh, yeah.

Kristin Hartjes:
... chasing after that next thing, and you're like, "Oh, this person's doing this and that's working, so I need to do that."

Christine:
Yes, so suddenly, you bought 10 courses, and you want to be a master in all social media platforms plus a superstar on YouTube, so it's like, yeah, I get it. We've all been that, I'm afraid.

Kristin Hartjes:
What I really think and bring things back to is really simplicity and doing one thing at a time and finishing that, and then moving on to the next.

Christine:
Exactly.

Kristin Hartjes:
That's really how I set up my program when I work with people. It's very step by step, like do this, and then we do this, because what I find otherwise is what happens is people look at the whole thing, and they're like, "Oh, my gosh, I'm back here. Look at what I have to do, all the stuff coming up," and just your mind, I like to say like analysis paralysis is what happens-

Christine:
Agreed.

Kristin Hartjes:
... but you're thinking of all the things you have to do, and you just get paralyzed.

Christine:
Exactly. That's what we say all the time. It's like just forget about anything tech right now. Just look at who you are. It's the number one priority. You don't need to worry about hex codes or about which font to use just yet. Let's just figure out who you want to work with, so I totally agree. Sometimes, it doesn't need to be linear. For example, I'm not a linear person. If I have a to-do list, there's no way that I'm going to start at the beginning and finish at the end. My tasks are going to be all over the place, but I do finish one box at a time, so that's been a huge project for me.

Christine:
Just today, I was looking at a course about Instagram and learning more about Instagram, and I was just like, "I don't have the bandwidth for this right now." It's just like, "No, everything's looking the way it should be. I think at a later point when I have breathing space, I can do this," instead of thinking, "But if I sign up in the next 12 hours, I get 500 bucks worth of bonuses," which I would ever use because I don't have time and I have three other courses to finish, so it's like... Then I was wondering if I should get my assistant to take the course, which is what I also do, but it's like I totally agree. Just learn to say no to [crosstalk 00:22:01] and to that instant gratification kind of thing, thinking that that's the next magic bullet. I think saying that, "No, I'm not going to start you right now. I'm going to force myself to finish this," it then becomes a habit after a while.

Kristin Hartjes:
Yes. Yeah, so that you can actually have finished things as opposed to a bunch of things that you've started but you haven't finished anything, which is what happens to a lot of people, and they're just like spinning. I think all of that is very true, and everyone works a little different so you have to find your rhythm in it, but I think simplicity is key, and when it comes to a lot of people who have a successful business, usually it's not super complicated-

Christine:
No.

Kristin Hartjes:
... all the time. It can be super simple, and it's-

Christine:
No. Both Kendra and I just have gone from very complicated to more than simple. It's like, "I just have one offering. That's it. There's two different ways of doing it, but that's it. I have nothing else." Again, Kendra has her courses, but she actually dropped her whole health coaching. She's just doing master business and her hair tissue mineral analysis. It's like we both really learned that lesson, which we advocate to everyone. Keep it super, super simple. Once you are having your financial freedom and you can breathe, that's when you can start creating add-ons that are maybe a little bit cheaper, a little bit more generic, and sell more to the masses, but you need to start with your core project that's actually going to bring money on the table.

Kristin Hartjes:
Exactly.

Christine:
Otherwise, you'll never get out of this angst, out of this frustration and all that stuff.

Kristin Hartjes:
Yeah.

Christine:
I know that you focus a lot of inner work, and I'm a huge believer in this. We talked a little bit about imposter syndrome, how dare I charge. What other things are things that are typical blind spots for people who want to start building their own health coaching business or health practitioner or health-related business? What are things that you typically see that people themselves actually don't?

Kristin Hartjes:
I think self-doubt is a big one. I think a lot of times what happens with self-doubt, we think what's the problem is the action we're taking or we don't have the right plan or we don't have the right systems in place, and we continue to be on this search for the right way to do it, like that magic bullet that's going to make your business successful. What happens is that you're ignoring your intuition. You're ignoring what, I guess, the thoughts that are going on in your head that a lot of times are keeping you from actually doing the things that can be really simple like we were talking about that are going to lead you to getting the clients and the income.

Kristin Hartjes:
When you have that, a lot of self doubt, you have a really hard time investing in yourself. You have a really hard time getting support in your business because you don't really believe that you can be successful with your business. That also keeps people from taking action in their business as well or just having weird energy behind their business. For example, a lot of people say they want clients and they want to create money in their business, but at the same time, they're terrified [crosstalk 00:25:34]-

Christine:
I know.

Kristin Hartjes:
... because they're afraid they can't really help them, they're afraid of charging for their services, like all these things, so I think it's really important to go and clear up these thoughts that people are having that are actually keeping them from moving forward when it's not, like I said, it's not actually the action usually. It's actually thoughts that are keeping them from getting [crosstalk 00:25:56].

Christine:
Oh, totally. Here's the interesting thing, people, it's that it's a blind spot, and a blind spot is called a blind spot for reasons because most of the time you have no idea that you are having these thoughts, hence why coaching is so crucial because you don't even know. You might be listening right now and think, "Oh, these poor people, but guess what? I can absolutely guarantee that you have some blind spots as well," and once you realize that, that's when change really happens.

Christine:
Once you have someone you trust and you work with that who is pointing out when you do have those self-doubts without realizing, you recognize them and you can catch them. Then you can work with, and you can overcome them, and you can live peacefully with them. They will still be there. But that is why it is so, so crucial to have a successful business in any business, but I think especially in health business. I think it's just with a certain breed of person who is drawn towards that area. I think it's absolutely crucial to get someone who's your sounding board and your mirror on this. You've been listening today, and Kristin is doing just that. I know that you have an amazing tool for our listeners out there. How do they get in touch with you, and how can they get instant [inaudible 00:27:26] from you?

Kristin Hartjes:
Yeah. Definitely. I have a guide that I think is a great starting point. One of my biggest passions is around the confidence piece, and I find that getting clear on what it is that you're offering, who you work with, really, your messaging around your business is such a huge piece of this. I have an Ideal Client Guide, and it walks you step by step through figuring out who is your ideal client, what's your messaging around that. That is something that you can check out. It's free. You can download it. It's a PDF. You can go through and fill it out, and-

Christine:
Amazing. If you need the URL, it's Kristin Hartjes, to Kristin with a K, different from me, K-R-I-S-T-I-N, and then H-A-R-T-J-E-S .com/idealclientclarity in one word, and we'll have it linked in our show notes as well, just as well with all Kristin's Facebook handle. She has a Facebook group, which I would recommend you join, YouTube channel, Instagram. She's everywhere, and we would highly recommend you get in touch with her if you felt that was a tingling connection today. It can only be beneficial for sure.

Kristin Hartjes:
All right. I would love it.

Christine:
Absolutely. Kristin, thank you so much for being a guest on today's show. I think there were so many messages that people just need to hear, and even if they think that's not for them, it most likely is, so we just both invite you to try this out, have a go, have a look at her worksheet, have a look at everything that she's presenting, and if it resonates, all the better. I want to thank you so much for being here today, and yeah, thank you.

Kristin Hartjes:
Yeah. Thank you for having me on. I love talking about this stuff, and I can tell we're both very passionate about helping other wellness practitioners get out there and grow their business, and I think the more-

Christine:
For sure.

Kristin Hartjes:
... of us out there doing this powerful work, the better the world is. It's important work, so-

Christine:
Agreed. We're all different, so people are going to resonate with different people, so which is why-

Kristin Hartjes:
Absolutely.

Christine:
... we want to present different people for our audience so that they can find that perfect coach. All right, well, we will be back next week with a Biz Bomb. It's all going to be about practical tips, so don't forget to look at that and just follow us on Instagram, on Facebook, on YouTube. We are everywhere. Don't forget to write us a raving review on iTunes. We would really appreciate it. That's it for today. Thank you so much for listening, and we'll talk to you next week. Bye.

Biz Bomb – Easily Create Content for a Year

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It can be difficult to figure out what to write about, post on Instagram, or what to say in your next video. We get it. In today’s Biz Bomb episode we have a juicy tip to help you schedule your content…not just for a week but for the entire year! It may sound intimidating and overwhelming but we promise it’s not.

In order to figure out what to write about, the first thing you need to do is divide up the type of content into 3 topic buckets and then within those buckets, create 7-8 subtopics. By doing this, you can then use those three main bucket over and over again, and it's just going to help to consolidate everything, to get some structure in there, and also for Google to pick up on those tags and to rank you higher.

Need an example? With Christine being an expert in the sleep realm, her 3 buckets are: psychology, physiology and generic. Then within the buckets, she created her subtopics: for psychology that included sleep anxiety, focus, depression, resilience, creativity, dreams, feeling of falling, and sleep paralysis whereas physiology included parasites, thyroid, food sensitivities, minerals, metals, neurology, pineal glands, and hormones.

From these, depending on your blogging schedule (weekly, biweekly, etc) you start planning. The first week is subtopic #1, then the next week is subtopic #2 and so forth. You can repurpose this content by then turning your blog posts into videos and batch record them (creating 1-2 months worth of content in one day of recording!)

Hope you found this helpful! Leave a comment below or DM us on Instagram and let us know what content strategy you use!

Connect with us on social:
instagram.com/360healthbizpodcast
facebook.com/360healthbizpodcast

@kendraperryinc
@sleeplikeaboss_

TRANSCRIPTS

Hello everyone, and welcome to the 360 Health Biz Podcast, Biz Bomb. So today I want to help you to schedule out your whole year in blog posts. What? All right, so this is what I use. I am very much still a pen and paper kind of girl, but if you like to type, then you can use that.

Now here's a fun fact. Count the weeks that you need in a year. It's 52 or 48, how many are left? I think it's 48 right now or something like that. And here's what you're going to do. Blogging is uber, uber important for your business. It's the way that you are going to get tracked by Google. And if you haven't yet listened to our first episode with Jamie Palmer, where we're talking about how you can post your videos and how you can turn that into a blog and create content and so forth. But one of the questions a lot of people have is what do I talk about?

So here's what you're going to do. What you are going to do is, well, what I did, is that I use my business blog for two different things. I use it on the one hand side for Sleep Like a Boss in terms of sleep, but on the other hand, also on Sleep Like a Boss in terms of business. So I literally have two different blogs, which means I only need half the content, but whatever you do, maybe you want to put it into two big categories, but whatever you do is you always have three subcategories. And the reason why you want to do that is because you can then use those three main bucket tags over and over again, and it's just going to help to consolidate everything, to get some structure in there, and also for Google to pick up on those tags and to rank you higher.

So what did I do? Basically I went to a spa, which you don't have to do obviously, but that's how I did it. But just take your time, take an afternoon off, have a cup of tea, and then write down your three categories. So I'm going to give you an example. For me, it is sleep. I used psychology, I used physiology, and then I used generic. And then in each of these three buckets, I needed eight subcategories. So for physiological, I want to talk about sleep anxiety, focus, depression, resilience, creativity, dreams, feeling of falling, and sleep paralysis. Physiological, I want to talk about parasites, thyroid, food sensitivities, minerals, metals, neurology, pineal glands, and hormones. And then generic, jet lag, sleep debts, circadian rhythm, bedroom environment, natural remedies, supplements, and naps.

So these came up fairly quickly, because I have these three main buckets and that's what I wanted to talk about. Now, this is if I want to blog weekly. If you only do it biweekly, then this would be enough. I do one week sleep, one week business, so I did the same process with business topics. So my three categories there were mindset, marketing, branding and copy. And then again, I have the subtopics. So if you structure it like that, it's going to be very easy to actually come up with those topics, because it's what you talk about with your clients over and over and over again. And that way you have your structure, you have your whole year lined up, and if you are at the beginning of this process, I would actually suggest to do it every two weeks. It's not going to be as overwhelming.

And what you do then is you batch. You basically use one day where you doll yourself up and where you get into the shower and put makeup on and so forth, or just make yourself presentable. And then you just shoot four videos. That's one month of content. Or maybe eight videos. That's two months of content. So that would be the process of what I would do, and it will help you to fill out your blog, to get [inaudible 00:03:43] by Google, and to put some content out there so that people can find you and pay you to help them with your specialty. Hope this was helpful. See you next week.

5 Steps to Get You to $5,000 a Month with Amanda Daley

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  • Listen to us here

No matter how much marketing and sales experience you’ve had, marketing YOURSELF is so different, so much harder than selling a product that isn’t directly tied to you. Amanda Daley experienced this first hand. With 19 years of marketing experience for big corporate businesses, she struggled to sell herself as a health coach. In fact, the first nine months of her business she didn’t have any clients.

After some mindset work and doing the work to determine her ideal client, she went from $0 to $5,000 a month. And today she’s letting you in on what the 5 steps are to reaching that so you too can make $5,000 a month.

The 5 steps to making $5k are: mindset, finding the right business model, client niching, the perfect sales sequence, and saying yes/no to a client.

1. Mindset
There are 3 important mindsets that must be worked on when you’re a business owner: imposter syndrome, scarcity, and low value. 

2. Finding the right business model
Whether you decide to go with one-on-one coaching or group programs, the goal is to choose ONE and make it the best you can be. Depending on your capacity and what you’re trying to achieve there are some coaches that can make $5/month with one-on-one coaching and some that find group programs to be a better fit.

3. Have the right eyeballs on you
As we have discussed many times, niching your market is incredibly important. Determining your niche isn’t about how old they are, what job they have, how many kids they have. It’s about what are the pain points and desired outcomes.

4. Ask for the dance
No, this doesn’t mean you have to two step with your client (please don’t do that unless you’re a dance coach). What this means is that you’re being seen by your ideal client, you have your discovery call with them and then you’re able to deliver your program or services to them.

5. Soulful sales
This is them step where you decide is this client the right client for you, and are you the right coach for them? You shouldn’t take on all clients just because they are coming to you. If something doesn’t feel right during your discovery call, it’s likely not a good fit.

Amanda Jane Daley is a leading Business Mentor for Health Coaches worldwide. Renowned for her marketing expertise (with over 19 years of experience!) Amanda has earned recognition by the world’s top advertising awards, and has built her own 7-figure coaching business in under 5 years. Founder of the successful health coaching biz 'Fuel Urban Wellness', Amanda combines her business + coaching savvy to mentor other health coaches to start their businesses and learn to make $5K+ per month — and has been dubbed the 'leading expert' for Health Coaches who desire a heart-fuelled business and a freedom-based lifestyle.

Freebie: https://www.amandajdaley.com/360

Connect with Amanda:
facebook.com/amandajanedaley
instagram.com/amandajanedaley
facebook.com/groups/healthywealthysociety/

Amanda’s freebie: www.amandajdaley.com/360

Connect with us on social:
instagram.com/360healthbizpodcast
facebook.com/360healthbizpodcast

instagram.com/kendraperryinc
instagram.com/sleeplikeaboss_

TRANSCRIPTS

Kendra: Hey everyone. Welcome to another episode of the 360 Health Biz Podcast. I am here all by myself, sadly Christine is not with me today. We are recording with a very special guest who is on the other side of the world, managing three time zones was not possible, so you just have me but we have an awesome episode as always for you. I'm actually super excited for this episode because I am interviewing someone who I followed many years ago when I was starting out my business as a health coach, so it's very much a full circle moment and we have like a total OG, the OG business mentor for health coaches.

Kendra: So we are hanging out today with Amanda Jane Daley or Amanda and she is a leading business mentor for health coaches worldwide renowned for her marketing expertise with over 19 years of experience. Amanda has earned recognition by the world's top advertising awards and has built her own seven figure coaching business in under five years. Founder of the successful health coaching biz Fuel Urban Wellness. Amanda combines her business plus coaching savvy to mentor other health coaches to start their businesses and learn to make 5k per month and she's been dubbed the leading expert for health coaches who desire a heart-fueled business and a freedom-based lifestyle. Welcome Amanda.

Amanda Daley: Thank you, thank you. So great to be here.

Kendra: Yeah, I'm super excited to talk to you today and we're going to be talking about five steps to 5k months and I really love that because I think everyone's talking about the 10k months, but when you're only making 1k a month, 10k seems crazy.

Amanda Daley: Totally.

Kendra: I would love to know, why don't you introduce yourself and just tell us like how you ended up here and why you focus on helping health coaches?

Amanda Daley: Yeah, sure. Absolutely. It is so great to be here and so special to hear that you've been following, for all those years, definitely. Yeah, it helps me reflect where I've come from, but when I mentioned the 19 years in online business and marketing, that was my whole life really. My first job was in the startup team of eBay in the UK as a young 21-year-old. And that was all exciting, but I really followed that path through the digital startups and working actually mostly in design and art direction in TV stations and then in Sydney for many years in advertising. And honestly online marketing and everything was like the poor cousin for many of those years, there weren't many of us who were really specializing in it so it's pretty cool to see where the world is today in marketing.

Amanda Daley: That was my background and I love it, marketing is everything to me and the problem is that my body wasn't keeping up with working in that corporate environment. And I literally used to spend every cent I make and run off whenever I could to go heal myself, because I thought I wasn't enough to keep up in the corporate environment. I was struggling really badly with adrenal fatigue, just all a host of issues really. And I was doing energy healing and yoga training and all the things to try and fix myself and to a degree had life-changing results as many of us I think did have a health crisis to get into health coaching, and then at same time it wasn't working.

Amanda Daley: So when I heard about health coaching it was just like, oh my gosh, this light bulb moment. And so of course I jumped and I trained to be a health coach and rather naively in hindsight thought, "Oh, I'll just throw in my whole advertising career and be a health coach because that's going to be easy, isn't it?"

Amanda Daley: I don't know what I thought, but I was that burnt out really at that time. And I guess when you meant to be on a different path, you really will be nudged and I did leave. That was early 2012 that I left my advertising career and started being a health coach. And the first nine months I had no clients, that was the reality.

Kendra: Yeah. It's amazing that you had all this marketing background and still couldn't figure it out. Right?

Amanda Daley: Could not figure it out. And I guess there's many reasons for that. One, I will say straight off I think is because selling ourselves is so much different.

Kendra: Yes.

Amanda Daley: You mentioned, my background I was winning international awards for people like Coca Cola, not clients we're proud of now, but big international clients.

Amanda Daley: No worries doing that, so why could I not get even a client? I think the first reason is absolutely that selling ourselves is really, really hard when we're not used to that. And then two, of course I was just copying everything that the schools taught me, which was not wrong, I think I just didn't get it or wasn't able to hear it in that way. So it took me quite a while to piece it together doing any training, and there wasn't specialized health coaching training back then either so piecing together things and what did and didn't work.

Amanda Daley: Yeah, but eventually I got it up and running 5k a month was a real for me turning point when I got to that, you could do that consistency, did that for a number of years. Many people were starting to sign up with me secretly to get business coaching because they could see what I was doing in the guise of needing health help. And I really was very anti it for a long time, moving into business coaching, all I wanted to do was help women, with their energy, with their... It sounds so cliche, but step into their power. What else is possible, expansion? And I did think marketing and business was the devil having come from that, I was so resistant for a number of years, but obviously one thing led to another and 2014 I yeah shifted to being... well during that year transitioned to mentoring.

Kendra: Yeah. Yeah. And now you just love the business and the tech. Right?

Amanda Daley: Well I love all of it. Now that was not of it for me, realizing, not shoving out that part of me. I do know marketing very well. I love it, live and breathe it, but at the same time I love that inner journey and I love all the healing work I've done and it was only when I realized that business was really going to be a conduit for me to do that work with women and I do find business is, as I'm sure you would agree, the biggest personal development journey on earth.

Kendra: Oh my gosh, yes. It is, it is.

Amanda Daley: So yeah, when I truly understood that I was still going to be able to do that work with women and realized what I was sitting on too. I wanted to be a health coach and I wanted to make a difference and I realized all these other people didn't know what I did and what I had pieced together. Yeah, so it all came together and I haven't really looked back, I'm still running the same program I started in 2014

Kendra: Really? Oh my gosh, I'm jealous because I lose interest after a year, I drive myself crazy.

Amanda Daley: Yeah.

Kendra: That's amazing. And I love what you said about thinking marketing and business was the devil probably because where you came from and I feel that a lot of health coaches have that same perception because maybe their experience with marketing and sales is like the shitty vacuum salesman who's tried to sell you a broken vacuum or this like in-your-face advertising where the commercials are on high volume and they're shouting things at you. But of course that's not really what we're doing with health coaches but I think there's such a slimy perception around it, that a lot of coaches don't even want to look into it. Right?

Amanda Daley: Totally. Totally. Yeah.

Kendra: And so I want to keep today super actionable because I know we're going to be going through those five steps. And I'd love to jump into that because I talk to so many health coaches and I know most of them are barely clearing like 2k, 3k a month. And like you said, that 5k was such a turning point for you and I know it would be such a turning point for our audience, like that's when you can start paying your bills, it's awesome.

Amanda Daley: Totally. Yeah. Yeah. Do you want me to dive in and...

Kendra: Let's just dive in.

Amanda Daley: Yeah. Cool. So look, step number one for me is actually what we started to talk about a little bit, is mindset and particularly, I often talk about money mindset. Now I'll give this a caveat, I personally feel that where I've grown my business to is 80% mindset, but without the 20% marketing... It's chicken and egg, you've really got to know the marketing steps to be able to do that. But I will start with mindset because we started talking about it.

Kendra: I would love to.

Amanda Daley: There's three particular mindsets that really stand out to me having mentored health coaches for the last seven, eight years. The first one is feeling like a fraud, not feeling expert enough. And I think we all felt that way and everyone can feel that way, but I literally see it from every single person who comes to me and they feel like they're alone. They feel like it's just them. So if we can see this as it's a mindset that's going on in you, but it's not you, it can really help us to understand, all right, this is a beginner thing and feeling like a fraud especially I think for health coaches, it's a new industry, it's not well-known. It's not like a personal trainer where everyone knows what it is. For me, part of this is cumulative when we're looking around at what is out there. I'm not a doctor, Oh, I didn't learn to do lab testing, Oh, I can't prescribe.

Amanda Daley: And I'm a big advocate of really understanding health coaching. Keeping in our lane, and that's a lot of the work I do with clients is my beliefs on health coaching are very much about prevention, very much about don't go to a doctor unless you can look them in the eye and say that you are doing movement, you are eating your veggies. And it's amazing how we beat ourselves up and just can't get in the game because of the fraud complex.

Amanda Daley: So that's probably the top one but equally up there for me is the scarcity. There's already too many health coaches out there, there's no room for me. Why would people work with me? All of that not enough-ness. And then I'd say the third one is low value, which is as healers we feel we shouldn't be charging a lot of money for our services. I mean this person's sick, how could I be charging? And ultimately that comes back to our own self-value, right? And how we value health coaching as well. So those mindset pieces to me got to be in place before we even...

Kendra: Oh yes, I totally agree. And it's funny because I saw so much mindset stuff when I was health coaching and sometimes I felt overwhelmed by it. And then when I went into business coaching I'm like, "Oh, it's going to be so different and we're just going to be talking about strategy and marketing and ads and it's going to be so easy." And then ultimately that's exactly what I was faced with. It's the fraud, which is the impostor syndrome and I think, how I see that manifest is coaches thinking they need to keep taking more certifications in more courses, right? They're just like, "Oh I need to take this training." And health-related trainings, they're not doing any business training. They're just like, "I need to take this certification in health and I need to get my gluten practitioner certification and then I need to learn about this and that." And it's like, well that one certification that you have is really all you need.

Amanda Daley: Totally. Totally. Yeah. The chasing of it and it's like trying to fill a hole that just won't go away if we don't look at these pieces.

Kendra: Yeah.

Amanda Daley: Yeah. And I personally, the program that I run is a group program, it's a mastermind program and I won't actually work with beginners one-on-one for the reason that I really believe you've got to be around other people and get, this isn't just you this is how we all feel and, you see Sarah yesterday felt like that and now she's putting herself out there and none of us... I work very hard on my programs for my clients to see, I'm not any different than you, this is what I've done, this is the mindset that it's taken. I just want everyone to know we're all in this together and we can make ourselves almost in a negative way too, special. Like, "Oh, it doesn't work for me," Or, "I'm not enough," and all these things and I just find, yeah working in group has been the biggest factor for me personally but also for clients in moving through that.

Kendra: Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Yeah, because it's true and I think with new health coaches, they don't even realize that these are mindset blocks, they just hear it as truth. So they're not even aware, they're just like "This is how I'm feeling and this is real and this is truth." When it's like, "No, we all feel those things," and even at this level that me and you are at now, we've been in business for over five, six, seven, you 19 years. We still feel it sometimes.

Amanda Daley: Totally.

Kendra: But we just don't let it hold... We know it's not true. We're like, "Oh hello fear. It's you again. Cool." Like, "I see you but I'm going to keep going."

Amanda Daley: Totally, and who you surround yourself with is so key. I mean coaches, mentors, finding someone who holds a new belief but also the people, your peers and people who are masterminds and things like that. So just yesterday, a lady said she got off one of my free trainings buzzing, and got on the phone to a girlfriend and the girlfriend said, "Ah, health coaches don't make money. Don't go into that trap," like this kind of thing and she was down. And I was like, "Well, if you want me to share, this is my reality all day, every day." We find what we look for, don't we? And who we surround ourselves with is a choice and it's so important.

Kendra: Yeah. And it's so true with friends and family, they don't really understand what a health coach does and really they just want you to be safe. And in their opinion, trying to start your own business and be a health coach, that is not a safe path and not one that they understand. So people saying that to you is really just them trying to protect you, but it's because they don't understand. Right?

Amanda Daley: Of course, so that brings us back right to that fraud. It's a new industry and no one understands health coaching. And that's in my opinion, our job to get that out there and to be speaking up and educating people and that comes with being leaders in a new industry.

Kendra: Yes. And it's true. And I love what you said earlier about feeling like, it's a saturated industry and there's too many. It's actually not, because it hasn't been around for that long. We're all like early adopters of this, so there's lots of space.

Amanda Daley: There's so much space, yeah. Totally.

Kendra: Yeah. Okay. So that's your one step is the mindset. And I love that you start with this because I like to start with this as well because it's just like if you don't have the mindset, you're just going to self-sabotage.

Amanda Daley: Yeah. And really that's what you got to keep doing. Right? So that's why I put it there.

Amanda Daley: So the second to me is having the right business model or by right, finding the right one for you. So many people come in thinking like, I'm just going to start selling single sessions or the six-month package from my school or whatever, and they haven't really mapped out, what do you need? And when we want to look at a 5k a month model, for example, the plan that I share with everyone is three to four days a week, three to four clients, or two to three days a week, two to three clients. Now that's just an example, but what I find from most health coaches is they don't want to be millionaires. They don't want to hustle 24/7 and if you do, great but many of them, trainings or business models focused on, like you said before, 10k months, six figure years, whatever at the beginning are really quite intense and that might not be what you want.

Amanda Daley: So I find people either overshooting or undershooting by trying to sell all these single sessions all the time. So actually getting out your calculator and working out first, what's my blueprint? How many clients am I going to need? How to make $5,000 for example, maybe I need five one-on-one clients a month and then we can work backwards in how you do that. But I find that if we don't work that out, especially a lot of people are working full-time jobs and trying to do this on the side or have kids at home, it again comes back to mindset.

Amanda Daley: It's a little bit like, thinking this won't work. Oh I'm too busy, I don't have time. Just getting in the facts, what is it I'm trying to build? How many clients? What's my financial goal? Where will that fit in my calendar? The structural plan if you like, first.

Kendra: Yeah, I love that. And then I think it can be a big wake up call for people, they're like, "Okay, I want to make 5k a month and I'm selling single sessions for $80 an hour." Do the math and you're like, "Oh I have to do 60 sessions or whatever it is a month and I can't find all those clients, and I can't fit that in my schedule."

Amanda Daley: I should know this number because it's in a webinar that I've done probably 20 times. I'm pretty sure the number is 143 you would need, if you wanted $5,000 from one-on-one sessions a month.

Kendra: Wow. It's impossible, you're going to burn out or you're going to just give up.

Amanda Daley: No wonder our brain in the background, right, is saying, "I can't do this. I can't do this." But you think about it again, when comparing to people like naturopaths and chiropractors, they have that many clients. They see 14 clients a day, times five days a week, times four weeks a month, they do. And then they have to try and get them to come back and it just doesn't make sense. So for me, working in what I call purposeful packages and designing a package that then fits that model is just the important foundation to get first.

Kendra: Yeah, I think that's important. And again, it's not their fault because our audience, they probably only have experience with a naturopath, in terms of someone they've seen. But health coaches aren't naturopaths, and in terms at least in Canada, I don't know what it's like in Australia, but a lot of people's extended health will cover the naturopaths service, so they have that going for them. It's maybe a bit easier for them to attract because there's a lot of people who just aren't going to see a health coach. They're just going to go with what's covered and what's on the list of professions. Right?

Amanda Daley: Yeah.

Kendra: But I also think those types of practitioners burnout.

Amanda Daley: Oh I've got a friend who, top-top naturopath and now many years on she's starting to mentor naturopaths, which is fun. But she tells me, "Amanda, everyone wants to be a health coach." Every naturopath wants to be able to work in packages, this is what they see with the health coach industry coming through. So there's always both sides. And so getting that package right is part of the business model, it's like to me one-on-one. And just on that note, a lot of the schools will teach a six-month program and people come out and most beginners would be terrified to go sell a six-month program when they've never done it before.

Amanda Daley: So we've got to find the sweet spot, right, between single sessions are not going to get results and then you're going to feel like a fraud because you're trying to sell something that you know is not going to get results in one session. I don't want to charge, versus six months and I work with clients to find their own package, however, I do find around the 12-week mark, around $1,000 package, can be quite an average of what people come out with and that matches to the 5k model.

Kendra: Right. And it's a good starting point. And I think $1,000 for a lot of people's going to feel like a lot of money, but at some point it's going to feel like you're going to want to bump that up. Right? And at some point what you charge $1,000 for now you might be charging 5k for in the future. Right?

Amanda Daley: And when you've got that business plan, therefore, okay, you've got the plan, you know you're going to do $1,000, you're not confident now, great. Go out and start at $500 or $400. And I always say I'm much more interested in you knowing the plan and knowing the model than how much money you're making because that will come. Yeah.

Kendra: Yeah. And I think I started at $500, I think initially that was my starting point. And I think you learn from that because your $500 package may not always attract the most committed clients and so I got frustrated. So I started raising my prices and at some point I hit a sweet spot where I was like, "I'm not getting as many people but the people I attract are super committed and they're ready and they actually do the work."

Amanda Daley: Love that. Love that. And then obviously the same model scales up. I've got ladies in my mastermind now, my more advanced, mastermind, making up to $20,000 a month from the same one-on-one and then not burning out and they're not even charging super high. Sometimes they might have to book a month or two in advance and then make that bridge but just again on the business model, I don't normally talk about this, but I just feel to say it right now, stick with the one business model that's probably one of my biggest tips. It works and stop looking for the next magical, maybe I should do an eCourse, maybe I should do this. As long as you like one-on-one coaching, stick with that and then allow your prices to go up and do the inner work.

Kendra: Yeah, I love that. And it's true, yeah. You can do really well with one-on-one, and I think it's a good starting point for all health coaches even if your goal is ultimately to sell a course or a group program. That one-on-one stuff is what gives you confidence, experience and it gives you the ability to get people results so that when you sell your course you're not just talking out your ass. Okay, so number two is business model and what's number three?

Amanda Daley: Number three, I changed what I call this one, today I'm going to call it eyeballs. I just like calling it eyeballs. Basically we'll just start with it's, who's my ideal client? Ideal client to me is something that is taught so wishy washy. It's one of those marketing terms that every school, every marketing course has, but ultimately in a nutshell, to me, target market is pain points and desired outcomes and at least for us to be able to talk too, and understand what someone in pain on, what do they want the outcome from. I honestly don't care a lot about how old they are, what job they have, how many kids they have, et cetera. However, I will say it needs to be one ideal client. And by identifying that we can now make our marketing message magnetic, literally if I'm talking to you right now, like I'm talking to you and you can feel it, whereas if I start talking to... Actually, my words have to stop like if I try to start thinking, "I'm talking to 50 people at once."

Amanda Daley: You actually can't do it energetically or physically. So identifying your ideal client and then every day the activity becomes, how can I be seen by that ideal client and ask them to work with me? So there is a two-step within that. Obviously your foundations as a beginner getting player on this is my ideal client, pain points benefits my one client that I'm speaking to and not being scared like you will attract everyone else and that's okay. But really that question for me, once we get into business every single day when we sit at the desk, how can I be seen by my ideal client and I say ask them for the dance. So, that's where our marketing has to start from, so many people, I can't find my clients. I'm sure you must get the same question.

Kendra: It's crazy.

Amanda Daley: How do I find clients, I just need clients.

Kendra: Who are you talking to? This is honestly I've seen this is the biggest blocking factor with new coaches and what I see as one of the main reasons why they're stuck and they don't know what content to create and they just don't know what they're doing. I would love your thoughts on why do so many health coaches resist it? Is that a scarcity, a fear thing? Like they just resist, resist, resist and they're just like, "No I don't want to turn people away. I want to help everyone. I want to be a health detective. I want to help people optimize wellness." And you're like, "No."

Amanda Daley: I think there's so many reasons why we have resistance, because some people basically just don't want to be coaching. And that's definitely, for me to date at the moment anyway, I'll only work in live programs because I do find that resistance, eCourses, et cetera don't tend to work when you have resistance and we all have it. So I'm not saying that won't change in the future, but at the moment that's why I stick with my high touch coaching. There's so many reasons, some of us actually don't want clients. I was working with a top level VIP client yesterday and every time I said, "Okay put out your marketing," it was the response back to me with some jumble about messaging and I had to say, "What's going on here? You could get clients to..." but she couldn't see herself doing it.

Amanda Daley: It was like bouncing out, "Oh, I haven't got my message. Oh, but my website..." And so we have resistance, let's just be honest about that. But resistance is not there to say, "I'm broken. I need to go fix myself before I can be a health coach." We all have it, we've got to move through it. Sometimes I think it comes back to the fraud, we are scared if we get clients that we're not going to get results, so it's much safer if we get stuck in a tangle of, "Oh I can't... my target market," like that is safe. It's a really safe place to get stuck. Secondly though, I do think I'm back to the scarcity, people have in their mind if they only talk to one person that they're not going to get clients. They think it's too tight and they feel bad, "What if I want to help Harry, and Trudy is my target market?" It's great, you have a magnetic message and Harry will come and you're allowed to work with them. It's just actually impossible to have, what I call a magnetic message, if you're not talking to one person because your marketing and everything should feel like, just like the two of us talking right now, having a coffee together. And the biggest thing I see is people coming into this marketing jumbo words that they've come up with for their target market. I don't even understand what you're... this isn't English.

Kendra: Yeah, I know I call it nutritionists language, it maybe makes sense to other health coaches and nutritionists, but it's like when was the last time you heard someone say, "I really just want to create a mindful routine so that I can be the best version of myself."

Amanda Daley: That's the third thing I was going to say, when you ask the question, why do people get stuck there? I always say as health coaches we're a little bit smarty pants. What I mean by that, is we've the training and we know that when you say weight loss, you really have an issue with your relationship, or you really are stressed, and as health coaches... Or maybe we've done mindfulness and we've done all the inner healing work and we want to jump there. And so what happens is we start making these packages and target market that sound like you said, "I'm here to empower women into their most enlightened something." It's like, "Huh?" You and I probably want that but I'm not going to pay for that.

Amanda Daley: This is why I say target market and messaging is more old school one-on-one marketing pain points, desired outcomes. I want the pill, look at all my oils or whatever, what have I got? Like the energy pill, the insomnia pill, this is what we buy. This is how we end... So I always say you need that business brand that is actually boring and then we can see you. We do see if you're putting out content or showing up and getting in front of these eyeballs with your marketing, I'm going to see that your heart-centered. I'm going to see that you're about empowerment. I'm going to see that you're holistic and not a scam. We do see you in your personal brand, when it comes to messaging, people will buy something that they're in pain for, full-stop. And that needs to be the match for this ideal client.

Kendra: Yeah, it's all about meeting them where they're at, right? Like they just started experiencing insomnia and sure, you know that they need to balance their blood sugar, eat breakfast and stop looking at screens at night. But right now all they know is I can't sleep and I just want you to help me sleep. Right? You really just have to lead with that and then your content and obviously your paid offerings are going to educate them on these other things in your presence. But yeah, you just can't make your niche the way that you get them there, it needs to be exactly what they're experiencing.

Amanda Daley: Absolutely. Yeah.

Kendra: Yeah. Okay. So number three is niche and ideal client, which is so important and I love talking about that. So what's number four?

Amanda Daley: Number four is what I call, ask for the dance. My accent is probably funny how I say that.

Kendra: I love your accent.

Amanda Daley: Even here in Australia, they can't understand it. So look, I find in the model that I teach is three boxes. So you've got be seen by your eyeballs, like I said. And the middle one is your discovery session or your sales call. And the third one is your delivery of your program. But how do we get from, I'm seen by new eyeballs, which to me is 80% of your work every day. But what I specifically said before if you listened, was how can I be seeing my ideal client and ask for the dance? And that's the bridge into getting on a call.

Amanda Daley: A coaching business is actually really, really simple, there's nothing more than those three boxes. And actually your job is just to get people on the phone... Is pretty much the job now. People go off and they make websites and flyers and all these things because they're hoping that will get people on the phone and they're doing all these long steps. So actually ask for the dance really needs to be heard, as in ask people to get on the phone, ask people if they want to have a conversation. And it's not 2012 like when I started out and you started out a similar time, where we could just do a blog post with, "Hey send me... If you'd like to get on a call," now we need to still put the call to actions in our social media, and in our pieces like "If you'd like to book a discovery call, and let me know."

Amanda Daley: But we are in the age of DMs and reaching out to people and having authentic relationships. That doesn't mean jumping into someone's direct message and spamming them with, "Hey come work with me." But if you see someone engaging in your posts, you see someone watching your videos, et cetera, start a conversation, get to know them and Instagram's wonderful for this. We do have to go that extra step of actually asking and when you say before, people have the resistance about eyeballs, I see more resistance on this. It's like people just can't hear it.

Amanda Daley: And this is the number one area I've seen when people go that extra relationship building and actually say, "Would you like to get on the phone for call with me?" And to me when we're looking back at the marketing model, 5k a month. Okay you want a client a week? How many discovery sessions? Maybe two discovery sessions a week. That's your job. It might not sound very sexy, but if you're working for me, your job when you get to your desk every day is to book me those two calls a week. And I do find people doing the marketing, and feel like they're being seen but they're not asking.

Kendra: Yeah. Yeah, I agree. I see that a lot. And I see it with free opt-ins, I see it with all kinds of things. It's like they say it once and then they never say it again and people aren't even aware of that there's this option to take the next step. You've really got to have something there for your hot leads, so people who are like, they've seen your content, they like what you're doing, they like your personality, they want to buy, but they just don't know how and then they forget, they're gone.

Amanda Daley: Totally. And we are in business, the same plan I said yesterday I was talking to resistance, what was going on and of course it came up like, "Oh my family and friends might think I've been talk about my business too much." At some stage we've got to make peace with that, if you want to be in business, you're going to have to market. And I know that none of us necessarily got into health coaching to be marketers but to find the love for that I think, to find the creativity for that and the piece around it. God, the impact we could be having. And if we say we want to be helping others through our work, we can be doing that through our social and content we create all day, every day, if we truly do what everyone tells me, "I just want to help people." If you do, then go be of service with this content and getting visible and asking people, "Can I help you?" Because they're sitting at home, wanting to be helped.

Kendra: Yeah. And I love that you said creativity in marketing because I find marketing super creative, it's one of the only ways I feel like I'm creative because I don't have any other outlets for it. So I really enjoy it for that. And so I think you just got to find like, you know where your superpower is in terms of content creation and then go spread your message. Go help those people. Go give them value.

Amanda Daley: Absolutely. And we don't need big audiences. I know a lot of things out there talk about needing to build a big list I think you do if you're going to do an online program or something like that, but honestly we all have even just on our personal Facebook page or [inaudible 00:33:09] of things. We don't need big numbers to get two people on the phone a week, we just don't.

Kendra: No, we don't. And I love that and I talk about that a lot, especially these days because maybe 10 years ago, sure it was not that hard to build a massive email list and following because all these algorithms weren't in place and it wasn't as crowded and all this. But these days unless you have a big budget, it's really hard to do that. So it's really about having a quality lesson and just to give the audience some context. I've talked about this a bit before, but I think I had less than 2,500 people combined when I made my first six figures in business and that was across email, Instagram and Facebook. It wasn't that much. It's really not that much, I think anyone can do that.

Amanda Daley: Yes, yeah. And obviously the marketing pieces do need to start coming in of going back to meetings, back to the eyeballs. Even in my advanced mastermind still pretty much 80% is how do we get you seen by more? And one of my top tips there is how can you tap into someone else's existing audience of that [inaudible 00:34:08] can start from scratch and getting back to this, where are the clients, ask a genuine question, where are they? They're following Kendra. Okay, well how can we partner with Kendra? How can we get in front of Kendra's audience? I think we over complicate it, it is basically, can I be seen by my ideal client and then ask for the dance, so that step three and four.

Kendra: Yeah, and I love that you talk about collaboration because I think it maybe can come back to that scarcity mindset. The idea of there's too much competition, like what she does means that I don't get it as much, but it's like there's really room for everyone. There's so many people online and what makes you unique is really your personality and there's no one else who was a personality just like you. So we can collaborate, do this podcast together even though we have similar audiences and still benefit. Right?

Amanda Daley: Oh absolutely. You know, one of the things I've always been proud of in my stage one mastermind is I've never seen at least to my awareness, any sense of competition in there. But I definitely do see when people move on to the more advanced implementation stage that I have. By that level because obviously it takes a while to get your foundations and by year two of your business, I find it's the collaborations between them. Again, you don't need the whole world just a small group of women and I'm sure you have the same in yours, start sharing a podcast with each other and then get each other on as guests. You don't need to even know anyone else. And I see this work pretty well with Facebook live shows, for people starting up. I've got a beautiful woman who actually has a voice impediment and therefore was going to leave because she thought, "I can't do videos and I can't do content," and we set her up with a Facebook live show and she just interviews like all the other ladies in the mastermind. And she's in her element because she doesn't have to be the focus on her vocals for a full hour. And so the collaboration and there's just no need for a sense of competition and I think if anyone does feel that, that'd be a key thing. It's a sense of resistance too, I think, so.

Kendra: Yeah. Oh, I love that. That's such a cool story. Yeah. I mean, really, there is something for everyone and if people don't resonate with you, that's okay, they can go resonate with someone else. Like not everyone is meant for you. And that's okay. It's just like in real life, not everyone's going to like you, you can't be friends with everyone.

Amanda Daley: I remember a mentor saying to me once when I was getting a bit triggered by that, like so many new coaches and so many whatever, and she was like, "You don't want all those people. Amanda," and it really gave me a sense of, "Oh yeah, like we don't want every person in the world." It's like we just want our dream clients, just stay in your own lane. Like I said, get magnetic in your marketing, get really clear. This is where I want to work, get culture and boundaries in that and you don't need everyone. And my little joke too, paraphrasing what she said there, is you probably don't want to work with everyone anyway.

Kendra: Yeah, it's very true.

Amanda Daley: Let other people be the right coach for that person.

Kendra: That's awesome. And so that's number four. And that is, I guess the dance, to get people on the phone, right?

Amanda Daley: Basically. Yeah.

Kendra: All right.

Amanda Daley: So that leads me to step number five, soulful sales and systems. So I think most people are terrified of that sales call and it's definitely something I think, I don't want to quote wrong, but a number of the health coaching schools I believe still do teach something called a health history or something similar as a way of getting on getting someone to buy from you and a health history will not sell. There's a reason that there's a resistance to them. It's valuable information, I think it can be great in session one of your program or something like that, but a sales call, it's soulful when you don't coach, and this is backwards for people.

Amanda Daley: The minute that you coach, you're actually robbing someone of the opportunity, which is supposed to be a discovery of, am I ready to transform, and are you the coach for me? To me, that's the only energy we want in a discovery call. Is this client ready to transform and is this relationship right?

Amanda Daley: It's simple to say, I get it because we bring all our baggage and we need to pay our rent, we need to pay our this. So we bring our money stories to the call and then we bring our, am I good enough in. Often what can happen is we start coaching to prove ourselves, especially as new health coaches, or we start blushing off a whole lot of information to be expert. And we're making that about, "Oh, it's all about me. Am I good enough?" As opposed to a sales call should be 100% about the potential client, almost to the point where you don't even have a script, almost, I do have scripts. And is it true from the energetic process that I take someone through that I teach, which is allowing someone to go high into their dreams.

Amanda Daley: Most people live in what I call the gray zone, and they're too scared and they're trapped. Take someone on that journey, what do you really want? Have you even thought about it? And then take them low and be honest, what's this pain actually doing? Most people, again, shove it down, pretend it's not there and as we open up that we can see what's really going on for the person and if they want to transform. That in itself to me is one of the most valuable things you could gift someone. So you're still giving, you're still giving value. And then the simple question after that is, is now the right time? Are you willing to change? You want to know all of that before there's any conversation of your program or anything like that.

Amanda Daley: And this is hard for me to succinctly put in one point but ultimately what I'm saying is have a way of doing sales that will actually lead to someone making a commitment in themselves, not regurgitating what happened to their parents' health or their current stomach problems. We'll get there but really one of the key pain points... Back to sales messaging, right? Key pain points, key desired outcome. And do they want to go on that transformation? Is it with you?

Kendra: Yeah, I love that you really want to find the right people because if they're not committed and you sell them into your program, then they're not going to get results. You're going to be banging your head against the wall and it literally kills your soul when you have this client who you want to help and they can't help themselves. Right?

Amanda Daley: Yeah. And we've got to be really clear on that as well I think, that as health coaches, I think we all are in so much integrity of what we give. Most people will over-give but one of the biggest healing pieces of my journey was really understanding, that I can never make my client do that work. I cannot be responsible for that. Like in the early days of business coaching, myself and my assistant used to not sleep after a call. We're trying to work out Sally's issue, and why is Sally's business... And I really have come to a place of peace and I hope I can pass that to everyone sooner rather than later. As coaches, we're not meant to be God, we're not meant to be someone's savior, we're not meant to do the work for them and we want clients who want to change. It's part of that first call, if that's not there, why would you put yourself through that? It's going to loop you back to step one of feeling like a fraud and terrified of getting on coaching calls. Because of course, we've got to give everything and of course, we've got to do our best as a coach. But more often than not, we're actually sabotaging by trying to solve everything, especially on that first call instead of leaning back and seeing, "Hey, do you want to make a change?"

Kendra: Yeah, I love it. And I think I've started calling them... I'd tell people don't even call them sales calls, they're just qualifying calls or enrollment calls. You're just qualifying this person to see if they're going to be the right fit for your program and if you can actually help them. But I love what you said about, we're not their saviors. We can't save our clients, they have to save themselves, we're just here to guide them. And I think it's important to make that really clear that when we work together, I'm going to be giving you guidance, but you're only going to get the result if you actually do the work, right?

Amanda Daley: Totally. And not being afraid, once you are coaching. If someone's not getting the results, don't blame yourself, speak to it. Call it out, I mean in a loving way that, "Hey Sarah, how are you going so far? You know I've noticed that some of the pieces of homework that I've given you, you haven't necessarily taken action on. Do you want to go back and review why?" That is very different than sitting at home going, "Oh my God, Sarah's not losing weight." Well, why? The only reason can be that she's not taking action or don't take responsibility, and then lean in and say, "What else could we do here together?" You're going to be so much more connected in hearing what's needed, than if you're in your head going, "Oh my God, I'm not good enough, she's going to leave. She's going to..."

Kendra: Yeah.

Amanda Daley: But again, I know it's easier said than done, start with a really soulful sales process and systems. The three systems that I always believe need to be part of that are, how to book calls, how to take payment, how to do a contract. And I think just by having those smart pieces set up in the background, then we can relax when, "Oh my God, the shock, someone actually wants to buy from me," the first client, and then we're like, "Oh, how do I do this?" If you can just have those there, you can feel supported, you can trust the process and to me too, there's an energetic flow in that. When your pipeline is set up, you can just, "Okay, let's get on the phone and I know what to do, if they're the right person for me."

Kendra: I love that. That's awesome. Okay, so let's just quickly review those steps. I'm like already like forgotten them. So let's go through them just so the audience remembers and then we'll let them know how they can get in touch with you.

Amanda Daley: Absolutely. So first step is mindset, specifically the three, the fraud, the scarcity, the low value for health coaches, and who you surround yourself with. So mindset, mindset, mindset. Step two is business model, getting really clear, how much do you want to make? How many clients is that going to take? How many hours a week? Where's that going to fit in your schedule? Does that fit for you and your values and your lifestyle? Step number three is all about those eyeballs. So identifying the ideal client and then every day, how can I be seen by more eyeballs, into step four and ask for the dance. So step four is really about asking, leaning in, having the conversations, not waiting for someone to engage with you, you're going to them. And then step five was the soulful sales and systems.

Kendra: Awesome, I love it. I think that's great. And I hope this helps everyone make 5k a month. And I just see in her notes that you have a freebie for our audience. Hey?

Amanda Daley: Yeah, we've actually set up a page for you. So @amandajdaley.com that's the letter J in the middle of my name there, AmandaJdaley.com/360, we have set up some of my top health coach goodies for your audience.

Kendra: Awesome. Thank you so much. And I guess so your website is just AmandaJdaley.com and then your social media was Amanda Jane Daley. So we'll put that all down in the show notes for everyone if you want to connect with Amanda and have her help you because, guess what? I think everyone needs a coach and mentor.

Amanda Daley: Absolutely. I love meeting any health coach. I'm so passionate about where this industry is meant to go, and any questions anyone's got or anything at all. I also have a Facebook group, Healthy Wealthy Society, which is where I mostly hang out. So I might mention that, because that's if anyone just wants to ask everyday questions about health coaching, or I know a lot of people probably aren't even in health coaching yet. We get a lot of people in there just wanting to check out the industry. So yeah, it's my favorite place to hang out.

Kendra: That's awesome, I actually think I'm in that group. I just really have not engaged in there in a while, but I think I'm in there.

Amanda Daley: I'll keep an eye out for you.

Kendra: Well thank you so much, that was super valuable. That's really, really good info for the audience. So definitely go follow Amanda, everyone. And thanks guys for listening. And we will be back in one week with our quick episode, our Biz Bomb series where we give you a super juicy tip for your business and then your brain explodes because it's so good. So we'll see you in a week and thanks for joining guys.

Biz Bomb – The Importance of Niching

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Welcome to your Biz Bomb episode of the 360 Health Biz podcast where we provide a quick tip to blow your mind and help your business. And today’s Biz Bomb is about niching. We have talked about niching A LOT so this is just a refresher of why niching is so important for your business.

The truth of the matter is - if you don't choose ONE target market, you are going to struggle to get ANY clients. Here's why: think of niching as the difference between  a dollar store and a specialty store. The dollar store has a lot of cheap stuff, whereas a specialty store has a limited amount of high quality items. If you try to talk to everyone, your message won't be clear.

When you have your niche client, you will be able to use specific wording, messaging and marketing strategies to approach your group. 

In this episode, Kendra walks you through an example of just how niching would work. Tune in now to take a listen!

If you're listening to this on the podcast and you found this helpful, just screenshot this episode, share it to your stories, mention @360healthbizpodcast, and we will share it to our stories. Just let us know in that story, what were your biggest take-homes and did this work.

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@kendraperryinc
@sleeplikeaboss_

TRANSCRIPTS

What's up 360 friends. This is Kendra Perry, your amazing cohost and this is your Biz Bomb episode where we give you a super juicy tip for your biz that takes up almost no time at all. So in this quick episode, I want to talk quickly about the importance of niching. I have been getting on Instagram in my DMs, so many questions about niching. In my opinion, your ability to define your niche is the first step in running a successful business. And if you don't niche properly, if you don't actually choose a market segment, then you are going to struggle to get clients. It's going to take you a long time to build your business, and there's a good chance you may not be successful at all. There is so much fear around niching, so much fear, and I get it because you feel, "Well, I'm a new health coach and I need clients and if I niche, I'm going to be excluding certain people." And I'm here to help and I want to help everyone. You cannot target the entire market on the internet. Okay?

That is crazy. There are ... I don't know how many billion of people online, but maybe there's 3, 4 billion people online. You can't talk to every single one of them, that is impossible. You can think of niching as the difference between deciding to have a dollar store versus deciding to have a specialty store. So you really need to choose one segment of the market out there and talk to them. A big reason why coaches aren't able to get clients is because they haven't actually determined a proper niche, therefore their messaging isn't clear and it's not necessarily speaking to anyone. So let's say that I am a woman in my 30s and I've just gotten adult acne, cystic acne all over my face. I do not know where it came from, I've never had acne my entire life and I'm just so devastated about this. And so I'm like ... Go to the doctor and they recommend Accutane, and of course some antibiotics and I'm like ... Read up on Accutane and realize it has all these gnarly side effects.

I'm like, "Okay." Don't want to take longterm antibiotics, don't want to take Accutane. There needs to be another way. There needs to be some natural solution for this. So I start googling, I'm googling, I'm googling and googling. What do you think I'm actually googling for? Am I googling how to improve my health and wellness or am I googling solutions for adult acne? Right. So I know what I'm googling for, I'm googling for solutions for acne. And as someone who actually struggled with acne, all my searches were related to acne and none of them involved the words "health", "wellness", "nutrition". It was literally just like, "Natural solutions for acne." And that's what I was searching over and over and over again. And let's say I get to two different health coaches websites and one of them says, "I help you uncover healing opportunities and improve your health and wellness so you can be the best version of yourself." Versus this other health coach I find who says, "I help women in their 30s struggling with adult acne, get clear skin naturally." Who do you think I'm going to choose?

I will never pick the first one because I'm going to look at that and be like, "Well, my health is fine. Actually really good health. Went to the doctor, got my blood work done and they gave me a clean bill of health. So my health is fine, my wellness is fine, but my acne is the problem." Just because we know as health practitioners that all the symptoms that people are experiencing are connected to their overall health does not mean that they know that. And so if you cannot meet them where they're at and where they're at is struggling with a very specific symptom, then they aren't going to pay attention to you and that's just not going to mean anything for them. So this is why it's so important to be very specific with your niche, otherwise you will attract no one. I really cannot stress how important it is to niche. When I work with health coaches and they are telling me, "Well, I can't get clients, I don't know what's wrong. I'm doing all the things, and I'm just not making enough money."

I will go on their website and their Instagram and I will instantly see that they don't have a specific niche and that is why, because their messaging just doesn't appeal to anyone. You really need to think about how do people actually think about their health? How do they think about the pain that they're experiencing? I don't remember the last time I heard anyone say, "I want to be the best version of myself. I really want to optimize my health. I really want to take my health to the next level. I want to feel well and get well naturally." People don't say these things. When people are struggling with their health, they say, "I want to stop having this chronic joint pain." They say, "I'm so sick of these migraines." They say, "I'm so exhausted, I'm so sick of being tired." They say, "I wish I didn't have diarrhea every day, it's so embarrassing." So you really need to meet them where they're at and that is with that one specific pain or symptom that they are experiencing that they know they desperately want to change.

Now, of course, as they learn from you, as they follow you and as they maybe go into your paid programs or courses, they learn that, "Wow, my acne is really connected to my gut. Interesting." Or, "I had no idea my acne might be caused by my hormones or my blood sugar imbalance." But you cannot lead with that because if you're like, "I help you heal your acne and clear up blood sugar imbalances." They're going to be like, "Well, I don't have blood sugar imbalances. I have acne." So you really need to meet them where they're at. Niching is so important. If you decide to focus on anything in the next week for your business, I want you to audit your niche. I want you to look at it and determine like, "Is it clear? Is this actually speaking to someone?" And if you're confused and you don't know, please send me a DM on Instagram. I will help you with your niche. I've been helping a lot of health coaches with their niche lately, but I will tell you if that is a good niche or not. My handle is Kendra Perry Inc.

So please do send me a message and let me help you because if your niche is not clearly defined, that'll be that big blocking factor towards you having a successful business. Okay? Okay. All right. If you liked this episode and you are currently listening on your smartphone, make sure to screenshot it, share it to your Instagram stories, tag @360HealthBizPodcast as and let us know your biggest take home and that will help us know that you like this content and you want more just like it. I think that's all I got, so we will see you in one week from today with the next full episode, and in two weeks with the next is Biz Bomb. Bye guys.

Email Marketing Part 2: Why You Need a Nurture Sequence

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Welcome back to part 2 of our chat on email marketing! In part 1 we discussed WHY you need an email list in the first place and which email marketing platforms we like to us. We also discussed what your email should include and some click-worthy subject line ideas.

In today’s episode we dive into two very important topics when it comes to emails – the first part is the boring, but VERY important legal talk around emails - including who you can legally email  and opt-in protocol (and opt-outs for that matter)!

But the majority of our episode we are talking about the fun stuff, the sexy stuff…the stuff that will make you money!

That’s right we are talking email marketing nurture sequences! A nurture sequence is basically a series of automated emails that you send to new subscribers to help them get to know you and build a trusting relationship with them. The sequence usually starts when someone signs up for a lead magnet (like a cheat sheet, freebie, etc.) – they receive your first email which is the freebie..and then what?

If you start selling your product or services to them immediately guess what will happen? You’ll scare them off!

In this episode, we talk about the first 6 emails you should send before you even try selling to your new subscribers. This includes telling your story (sometimes over the course of a few emails), creating cliff hangers, establishing a schedule, tooting your horn with some testimonials, creating engagement with a “reply to this email”, plus more email marketing tips and tricks.

We also chat about micro-conversions and selling your method. What are those you ask? You’ll have to tune in to find out!

Be sure to listen to Part 1 of the Email Marketing series here.

Still not sure where to start? Download our Email Nurture Sequence template here to help you out.

Connect with us on social:
instagram.com/360healthbizpodcast
facebook.com/360healthbizpodcast
instagram.com/kendraperryinc
instagram.com/sleeplikeaboss_

Kendra's HTMA Expert Course is now open for enrollment! The course starts February 10. Enroll now: https://go.kendraperry.net/htma

TRANSCRIPTS

Christine H.: Hello, and welcome everyone, to this new episode of the 360 Health Biz Podcast. Today, you have your two favorite hostesses with the [most-esses 00:00:11] in the Health Biz Podcast world. Miss Kendra Perry from Canada, being snowed in right now. Then, Christine Hansen from Luxembourg, where it's actually pretty sunny for this, generally. We're really excited to be with you today, as we are recording our second episode on email. How to write your email, how to structure it. We already talked about it in the last episode, so check that out. Today, we're mainly going to talk about how to make it work for you to do sales.

Christine H.: Stay tuned, but before we dive deep into the nitty gritty of this, we have a lovely, lovely listener who we adore who left us a review. Here's what's been said about us.

Kendra Perry: Okay, so we have a review from Jennifer [Blaugh 00:00:58], and I hope I said your last name right, Jennifer. She is an FDM. The title of her review is, "Seriously on-point content." Thank you, Jennifer. She says, "I am a fellow FDM, and I am trying to ramp up my health pushing business. I've been listening to all sorts of podcasts and webinars. This one is legitimately chock-full of great content, relevant information and useful, actionable advice. Seriously great stuff. Thank you, ladies, for all your hard work." Well, you are welcome, Jennifer, and we fucking love you.

Christine H.: Yes. Yes, we do. We love this so much. My little heart is singing right now.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: This is amazing. Thank you. We're going to do our best to spoil you rotten in this episode as well. As email marketing is a huge, huge thing. A tool that is not easy. I think a lot of it can go wrong, but it's also the first thing that a lot of us are confronted with. Today, we're going to basically pick up on our last conversation. To let you know, first of all, how can you stay on the legal side, and then how can you make people just give you their money like a buttery, sweet transaction leaving everyone happy? Kendra, let's begin.

Kendra Perry: All right. We're going to bore you a bit first, so stick with us. Then, we're going to get into the sexier stuff. We do want to address the legal stuff, just because it is really important. You want to make sure you're not breaking the law with email marketing. Then, we're going to talk about email nurture sequence. You may not know what it is. Actually, a lot of the coaches I've talked to don't know what it is. We're going to talk about what that is, and why you need one, and how to do it. We're going to give you a step-by-step process.

Christine H.: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: We're going to be talking a bit of the legal stuff. Christine is going to speak to the GDPR stuff, which is the European rules, because she's more familiar with that. I just wanted to speak to some of the Canadian and American rules. This is one thing that's across the board. You need to get people's permission to email market to them. If you have a bunch of people's emails from something else, and they didn't give you their email address knowing that you were going to send them marketing emails, you actually can't use their email. You're not allowed to do that. That's completely illegal, and it's against privacy. You don't want to do that. You always want to make sure that people know they're opting in, you have people's permission to use that email.

Christine H.: Yeah, so maybe to give you a concrete example, let's say you go to a networking event and you exchange business cards. You are not allowed to take those business cards and type that email address of that person into your email marketing software. First of all, it's not polite. People are going to be annoyed at you, because when it happens to me, I get furious. It's also illegal. Anyone who gives you their email address that doesn't explicitly say, "Okay, you are allowed to send me new, or regular updates," basically that's illegal.

Christine H.: The same is also, and i know that a lot of people do giveaways, or if you are having a fair, you have things where you can win something, and then the entry, not tickets basically, have the email address of the person as well. You do need to have it a disclaimer somewhere that really, clearly states that you are going to email them regularly. Otherwise, again, you're a criminal, basically.

Kendra Perry: You're a criminal. A way that I do this that makes it really obvious. On all my landing pages where I'm offering something for free, the button always says, "Join my list, and you'll get the free guide." It always says that so it's very clear that they're joining my list. Yeah, you just want to be really obvious with that, because I have come across the people who are like, "Oh, I have all these emails from my personal training clients. Can I use that?" I'm like, "No." You could email them and say, I'm going to be sending out emails on this. Are you interested? Do you want to be on this list? If they say yes, then you can use that email but you do need to get their permission first.

Christine H.: Exactly. The same is true, actually, when you do sales calls, or preliminary sessions or whatever you call them. The people who leave their email address there to get a reminder of a call, they did not accept to be on your email list. Unless you tell them that they are going to be added, and have a checkbox to ask them whether they are okay with that or not, you cannot just connect your scheduler to your email software, and then automatically add them. It sounds so easy, and it wounds like, "Okay, I'm going to get a little leads," which I agree, but it's not legal.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. Something you can do, like what I do, is I do add my clients to my email marketing list if I ever have to send communication to my clients specifically, but I exclude them from all the marketing emails. They're literally just getting the occasional email, like, "I just raised my prices. Here is the information. This is changing." Anything that's specific to client communication where I want to email all of them, but they don't get the marketing emails. That's really important.

Kendra Perry: Now, in terms of opting in, there is something called a single opt-in, and a double opt-in. The single opt-in is when you literally just put your email into that landing page, or that pop-up. Then, they automatically get the thing. A double opt-in is where they put their email address in, and then they get another email that says, "Confirm your subscription," or something like that, so they have to double opt-in.

Christine H.: They have to click on that.

Kendra Perry: Now, from what I can tell, and I know it was like this. I can't tell if it changed. I went online and did some research, but in the US you can have a single opt-in. In Canada, you have to have a double opt-in. If you're a Canadian, you're going to go with that double opt-in option, because that's the law. In the US, you can have single opt-in.

Kendra Perry: You can get this set up. All the email providers will have this option. You can turn it off, you can turn it on. It's usually just the clickable button anytime you are building out your sort of little email sequence, or little form. If you are in Canada, and I don't know if you know that in terms of Europe. Do you need a double opt-in?

Christine H.: I am not sure, to be honest. I don't think so, but I would actually check on that in a second.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, so we'll throw that in the show notes.

Christine H.: Yes, exactly, but I don't think so. I don't think you need the double opt-in necessarily, no.

Kendra Perry: Okay.

Christine H.: There's different statistics as well that show that if you have a double opt-in, the people who actually bother to click that link are going to be much more likely to actually engage with your emails.

Kendra Perry: Yes.

Christine H.: Even if it's not a requirement, it might be a good practice to already filter tire kickers who are just going to take space in your email marketing software. Just to make sure that you have primo material in there.

Kendra Perry: Exactly, yeah. I agree. Just that extra step, because a lot of people just get shiny object syndrome. They're just like, "Fuck yeah, I want to opt in," and they just opt in for all these things. Then, they never actually go to their email and check that, right?

Christine H.: Exactly. This is something which, actually we can talk about this right now. If you do this, basically what happens, when people fill in their email address and they click submit, or get now or whatever, you usually have a choice from your email marketing software to either just reload the form, or to send them to a different page. Whatever you choose is fine, but there should be a little message popping up, telling them to check their inbox, check their spam box or their junk folder, to make sure that they get that second email.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: If you don't, people might just be frustrated because they think it's not working, when it's actually in their spam. We always recommend to personalize, and customize that, and already do that in your voice. If you're someone like Kendra and I, we would probably say, "Woop-woop," or something like that. You're good, now go over to your inbox and make sure that we didn't land in your spam folder. A sad face, something like that. Make sure you-

Kendra Perry: Yup. You bring up a good point there, and I think it's also a good point. You know, so many of you guys just have forms on your website? Then, when people opt in, nothing happens. I've seen a few websites where it's like, you get the thing but there's nothing that tells me what's going to happen next, and just so remember, they're giving away something that's personal. You need to make them feel...

Christine H.: Protected.

Kendra Perry: ... protected by saying, "Awesome. You're in. That guide, or that checklist is on its way to your inbox. It's going to be there in five to 10 minutes, so make sure to check your promotions or spam. If you have any issues, this is my support email where," you know.

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: Sometimes, forms are broken, right?

Christine H.: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: If you have someone opt in for something and they don't get the thing, and they have no way of contacting you to be like, "This didn't work," that trust is gone.

Christine H.: Yeah. Agreed.

Kendra Perry: Just saying.

Christine H.: Totally. The second thing that I find will distinguish you from the crowd is that confirmation email that is coming then. A second email that is going to be, "Click here to..." I don't remember what they say, it's a confirmation email. Usually, your email software will allow you to customize that, so brand it. Brand it according to how the newsletters are going to look like afterwards. Write it in your lingo. Tell them, "You are our favorite. Now, just click this little thing and we're good to go." Something that you would say so that people immediately see that you're not a robot, and it's not just tack, but it's actually you behind your business. I find that really makes you stand off on the crowd. You can make it a bit funny.

Kendra Perry: I would say the other thing too, is in the subject line, what I always put is in brackets, "Download," and the name of the thing.

Christine H.: Yes.

Kendra Perry: Make it really obvious so they're like, "I'm downloading this free sleep guide," and it says, "Download, Free sleep guide." I'm not searching for it. It's not some fancy email subject that I don't recognize as what I just downloaded. That's really important. In that confirmation email, this is not a time to sell, this is not a time to offer anything. Literally, keep it short and sweet. Say, "Thanks for downloading the guide, this is awesome. Here is the download button." They're just warming up at that point, so it's not time to pitch a course, or pitch a service, or even your free call in that email.

Christine H.: No, no, no. Don't do that.

Kendra Perry: Before we get into email sequence, could you just briefly speak to, Christine, just the GDPR [inaudible 00:10:59]? I think that's important for, I think everyone. Not just your emails, right?

Christine H.: No, I agree. Yeah, so GDPR has been creating [inaudible 00:11:05] especially in that two years ago when it came out. Basically, what it is, you need to know that it was a huge problem that too many people got spam emails. The European Union basically made it illegal to collect data. Well, illegally as we've discussed it now, but also certain types of data, and you have to have a structure within your company. There needs to be a designated person who is taking care of that. You need to make sure that you're never going to give the information that you gather from your people to a third party. All of that was created, and thrown out there. It's easy if you're a huge company and you have a legal team taking care of it. If you're a small business, it can be completely overwhelming.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: In the beginning you had all worst case scenarios. Truth is that there hasn't been a single legal case done yet, so there is no previous court case yet. Chances that someone is going to pick on your little company to be the first one is very, very unlikely. There's different things that you can do. The double opt-in is one thing that is going to protect you straightaway. The other thing that you need to do is, you need to have a little checkbox below the opt-in form, which means there's a little box that people fill in their email address. We've discussed this before, if you want to add their first name or not. This little box, they need to check the box where they really give you consent through that. There again, the wording can be, "I agree with terms and conditions," or, "I agree with your privacy..."

Kendra Perry: Policy?

Christine H.: Policy, privacy policy. You need to have that on your website. There needs to be a link to that on your website to that privacy policy. Every website needs to have that, and you can have templates that are GDPR compliant. It's just really to cover your ass, basically. To make sure that their email is just for you, and your company and not for anyone else, and so forth.

Christine H.: It used to be a bit tricky, because obviously the emails are being stored on your email marketing service. The questions was, is that a third party seller or not? I think no answer has really been found yet. There's a lot of nitty gritty on that. I'm not a complete legal expert on it. What I can recommend you to do, and I know that the Being Boss team, they have a podcast which I actually recommend, they have done tons of research on that. They spend a lot of money on that, and they have a great podcast episode on that too. Go, and check that out.

Christine H.: For the rest, I invested in a GDPR template that was developed by a lawyer here in Europe. I think she was German, I'm not sure. It's basically the linguistics, it's highlighting when you have to fill in your own things. It will ask you to have an office designated for all of this, but if you're a one-person company obviously you are going to be the officer. It just means that there needs to be a person that is good to be responsible for the information that you are collecting.

Christine H.: I think the little checkbox is the most important one. Personally, I also have to say that I'm a slacker, and I haven't done it. I also have to say that different email software is so much better at this than others. I know that MailerLite has one that is GDPR compliant. You just tick that box when you set up your opt-in box, and you just say you want your advert, and it is filled with GDPR compliant lingo. You basically don't have to worry about it.

Christine H.: The negative thing is that they can be off-putting to people. Every step that you're adding to the process of people giving you their information is going to put them off. It's literally the easiest, the quickest is the best. I also have to add that, of all the European websites that I've seen so far, there's not many that are actually doing this. Literally, none.

Christine H.: I think it was just a huge scare two years ago or so, and right now people are breathing again and it's loosening up again a little bit. What I would suggest you do is to have a double opt-in and to have a little checkbox next to your email box to make sure that people know that they are giving you their information, and where you say that you won't sell it, or that you won't share it with a third party. Then, you're good to go.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. Yeah, and I just want to mention that-

Christine H.: Have a privacy policy.

Kendra Perry: Yes.

Christine H.: Sorry. That's one thing that you need to have.

Kendra Perry: You do, and especially if you're running any ads. Facebook will disapprove your ad if you're sending people to a page that doesn't have a privacy policy, or doesn't have a GDPR link.

Kendra Perry: The other thing I just want to mention is, this is something that applies to more than just Europeans. If anyone is opting in from Europe to your page, that technically makes you need to have [crosstalk 00:16:01].

Christine H.: ... reliable.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. If you don't know where your people are coming from, and I guarantee there might be one person, a few people, or even an American or a Canadian who are just in Europe traveling.

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: I think the double opt-in is a good way to go.

Christine H.: It's a good way to go. It's not compliant... That's not what I want to say. It's not mandatory. It's not something you need to do, but I just think you are covering your bases a bit if you have it, and make it fun. It's a pain-in-the-ass, but make it fun.

Kendra Perry: Definitely.

Christine H.: That would be a good one. All right.

Kendra Perry: All right, let's stop with the boring shit.

Christine H.: We already gave some good shit there, on how you can it less boring, so that's fun.

Kendra Perry: Okay, we're going to be talking about email nurture sequence, which is basically... it is a sequence of emails that you send new subscribers. The whole purpose of it is to build trust, to have them get to know you and your sort of method, and also how you can help them, right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: I can't remember the touch points, but usually before people invest, I read it was 36.

Christine H.: 36?

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: Crazy.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, that's what Chalene Johnson said on her Build Your Tribe. She said it used to be much smaller, but these days it's about 35 or 36.

Christine H.: Oh, wow.

Kendra Perry: I might be a bit off on that number. What that means is that they need to see 36 different pieces, or come into contact with your brand 36 different times before they're ready to buy. That might be that they listen to a podcast episode, and then they receive an email. Then, they see a social media post, and then they get another email. That's the thing. That's why it's really important not to pitch too quickly, because it can people a really long time to warm up. I had two touch points with certain people and me, personally, I invested really quickly in certain people's things because I just connected instantly, so it's not going to be true for everyone. For some people it's going to be longer, right?

Christine H.: Yes.

Kendra Perry: That email sequence really just helps them get to know you, and decide if they like you and just get familiar with who you are, what you do and how you can really help them. I've seen email sequences be three emails, I've seen it be up to 30-40 emails. Again, it's going to be different for everyone.

Kendra Perry: Again, it depends on your business. You may have to test different lengths. For new people who haven't done this before, I usually recommend a six-email sequence. I think that's enough time to sort of tell your story, introduce your method and gain a bit of trust with your audience. We've already talked about email number one, which the only purpose of email number one is to deliver your free offer, and also, I say, set the stage.

Kendra Perry: I always tell people, if you're sending them another email, I just say, "I'm going to be sending you a few emails over the next couple weeks that's going to teach you about this, this and this." Tomorrow, or two days from now, or in an hour from now, or however you set it up, "I'm going to be sending you an email titled," insert subject line, "Stay tuned for that email."

Christine H.: Yes, great. [crosstalk 00:19:09] The other thing I really quickly want to mention is that we call it either email nurture sequence, or an email funnel. I just want to say that these two things are the same. It's just different lingo in marketing. Then, also it really depends, as Kendra said, on what your business is. If you want to sell products, if you want to sell coaching services, which I guess most of you do. It also depends on the price point. What do you want to sell at the end of your funnel?

Christine H.: The first thing you should do, and I think we were already talking about that when we discussed the freebie, which is people actually want, and give you their email address that triggers all of this. It has to be created with what you want to sell at the end of the sequence, right?

Kendra Perry: Yes.

Christine H.: We talk a lot about this, but you need to have the goal in mind first. Then, reverse-engineer it. What is your end goal so that you can seed, slowly and subtly, without shoving it down their throat. Have that in your mind first, and then email number one in this sequence, or funnel would be where you just deliver the freebie. That is basically the end. If you reverse-engineer it, it's actually the last step, so to say. That's just a little clarification for newbies who have no clue what we're talking.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and that's really important. It's like, if you ultimately want to sell them a program that helps them boost their energy, then your email nurture sequence shouldn't be about gut health, right?

Christine H.: Yes.

Kendra Perry: You keep coming back to one thing. This is the most important thing, and we know that most coaches are struggling with this. You need to have a clearly-defined niche. Not two, not three, not four, not 10. One niche that people actually know what it is. I see people niche-ing in metabolism. Nobody knows what metabolism is.

Christine H.: Nobody knows what it is.

Kendra Perry: Right?

Christine H.: Yes. Don't forget that your lingo needs to be what they speak, not what you learned in your education.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, absolutely. I know health coaches are super nerdy, and you want to prove that you're smart, and that you're knowledged. If you speak in words that they don't understand, there'll be no connection. You just want to make sure that everything is connected, which is a really good point.

Christine H.: You can have several of those sequences, or funnels in your business. If you have, for example, products, if you have a supplement line, or if you have DIY programs, or Evergreen programs, you might have different opt-ins on your website that will lead to those different product [inaudible 00:21:35]. You would have different funnels in your email marketing software.

Christine H.: What we're going to teach you today, you can basically take those emails and just personalize them to that product, or service that you are designing. The content, their personality, or the feeling that [inaudible 00:21:53] about is going to be the same.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and guys, I have a template. I have an email nurture sequence template, and we will link to that in the show notes so that you guys can get access to that. I think that'll be really helpful.

Kendra Perry: In your nurture sequence, let's say we've delivered the freebie. You're going to send them another email, and you might send it an hour later, you might send it a day later, you might send it two days later. It depends, and you may have to play with that. You can set this up with any email marketing platform. This is going to be called an automation, I believe, in most email platforms.

Christine H.: In automation, or workflow I've seen it as well.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, right. I think I've seen it as workflow too, yeah. The first email that you sent after that confirmation email, this was email number two... You want to tell them your compelling story about either why you struggled with your own health that's related to your niche, or maybe why you're so passionate about it. I guess not all of us have personal stories with our niche, but if you do have a personal story, tell it. If you don't, there's obviously a reason why you decided to niche in this, and you obviously feel passionate about it for a reason. Tell that story, and you want to make it compelling, okay?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: People want to know your story, but you also want to refer back to them as much as possible.

Christine H.: Yes, certainly.

Kendra Perry: I like to do, can you relate? Does that make sense? Have you had that experience? Is this familiar? Always coming back to them. You really want to spend some time on this. You want to make sure your story is compelling. Then, what I do with this is, I basically end the email in the middle of the story climax, or that most dramatic part of the story. That's going to be... I think I've heard it called a few different things, and I'm gapping on it, but literally it's that darkest point, or that vague transition point in the story where everything changed. Usually, we can tell a story somehow in that way, where you maybe were interested in health and then suddenly you realize, you're like, "Oh, my God," or in your own personal story you were like, "I was struggling so hard, I hit rock bottom. Then, I discovered this thing."

Kendra Perry: End that story in the middle of the climax so they're like, "Oh, my God, I need to know what happens next." Then, you're going to say, in one day, in two days, in three days, whatever, "I'm going to send you the next email titled..." Give them the title, "where I'm going to share this, this and this." The rest of your story. Yeah.

Christine H.: Exactly. That's something that happens too much, and it depends, I guess, whether your clients are confronted with this a lot or not, I personally can see through this now. I don't like it if I get too many emails at once. Yeah, sometimes I recommend to start with one a day, and then space it out every two days. I like that, actually, but just tell them in a couple of days you're going to get the next [inaudible 00:24:42] or something like that.

Kendra Perry: I think I send my note every two days. That seems to work for me.

Christine H.: I think that's polite. Yeah, exactly. The other thing that you can do is, while you are talking about your story you can already sprinkle in a testimonial. What you can say is, which later on have my client X, Y, Z with their da-da-da. It's just going to be read fluidly. People don't really realize that they've read this testimonial already, but they are ready to connect with you with success stories about their problems. That's a good way of doing it. Then, I think what we do a lot in our emails is, can you relate, or if you have a question reply to me now. Just say, "Reply to this email," and actually those people do that.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and I do that in pretty much every email I send out. I say, "Reply to this email and let me know." It's great, because if they actually do reply to that email, your emails are probably never going to end up in their spam, or promotions ever again, which is great in terms of deliverability. You can also get a lot of research. You can learn a lot about them. I store all these email replies in my Gmail, and then when I'm going to writing a sales page, or creating some sort of training I literally go through, and I look at the words they're using, and how they're describing their problem. You can actually learn a lot about them. Then, people are pretty excited when they reply, and then you actually reply back and help them.

Christine H.: Yes. Exactly.

Kendra Perry: They're like, "Oh, my God, I can't believe you responded." That's a really good way to do that. Now, I often add that in a PS. I'll be like, "PS: Reply to this email with," blah-blah-blah, or at the end of the email. Then, in your email number three, that's where you're telling the part two of your story, where you're basically telling them exactly how you solved your problem, or you solved someone else's problem. You basically teach them how you're going to show them to do the same with their problem.

Kendra Perry: You just sort of pick up on that story, and then what you want to do is, again, tell them, "I'm going to send you another email in two days," or whatever and, "This is the title of the next email."

Christine H.: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: Those would be a couple of things. Run through your sequence, and I'm going to go and do other things as well, so we're going to see.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. All right, so email number four, I call this Aggravate the Problem and Surprise Them. Remember, they have a problem, I'm just going to use fatigue as an example. When I say aggravate the problem, you really want to make them feel like, this is a problem. I'm tired all the time. I wake up and I'm tired. I walk through the day like a fucking zombie because I'm exhausted. I come home and I'm even more tired. This is causing me pain. I'm missing out on all these other things I want to do in my life because I'm so fucking tired. You really want to speak to those pain points. Pain points are basically the problems that your ideal client has. If we use fatigue as an example, it might be, "I wake up in the morning and I feel like shit, even though I slept for eight hours." That's a pain point, right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: "I crash in the middle of the day at 2:00 PM, and I need to have a nap." That's a pain point, right?

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: Try to think of all those issues that they have in relation to the one bigger problem that they have.

Christine H.: Great. Okay, surprise them.

Kendra Perry: With Surprise Them, it's kind of like empower them that they have the power to change their situation. That's how you surprise them, because they may have been told by doctors that, "You're just a middle aged woman, and you're just getting older," right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: They've probably been disempowered with their health. They may not actually really know, or feel that they can change their problems. Surprise them by telling them that, "Hey, your health is your responsibility, and you can change this. I changed this, and I've changed this in all these other people I've worked with," if you have. You're surprising them to be like, "You know what? This is in your control, and you can change things." That's how you surprise them.

Kendra Perry: I also like to throw in there to tell them it's not their fault. You know? You don't want them feel bad.

Christine H.: Yeah. Oh, my God. Yeah, huge one.

Kendra Perry: Most people have been given terrible information about their health, or they've been told...

Christine H.: This is it.

Kendra Perry: ...You're just a woman, this is normal, you're just getting older. Oh, it's because you're in your late 30s."

Christine H.: Exactly. Here's your diagnosis, now live with it, you know?

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: Exactly. Just saying, if you don't have that story... For example, I don't have personal stories, I use my clients' stories. I would, for example, describe what they tell me when we are on our first call together. Especially with them, I really use similar language. Then, for the surprise factor I would say something, "What he didn't know," or, "What she didn't know was that..." Something that I know when I tell it to my clients their eyes light up, and they're like, "What?" This is actually one of these little things that will already make people feel like, "I knew that there was a link there, but nobody believed me," something like that. That's the surprise element. I just use someone else's story and it works really well. You can write a beautiful narrative.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and I love that you're saying narrative. People really connect to stories. Stories are very much in our DNA. Our ancestors shared stories to spread information. If you can make it like a story, then people are going to be really engaged, and really into it. Then, always at the end of this email you tell them the title of your next email coming, and when you're going to send it.

Kendra Perry: Then, in email five, this is where I like to devote a entire email to a testimonial. Where you share, and if that person has given you permission to use their image, put an image in there. Just tell the story. The whole email is of [Gemma 00:30:36], who was able to reverse her fatigue even though she'd been diagnosed with chronic fatigue, and had it for 10 years, right?

Christine H.: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: How were they able to solve it? Using your particular method, right?

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: Perfect.

Kendra Perry: Again, if you don't have one yet, you could use yourself if you have that personal information, or you could use a friend, a family member, a mentor. Someone who... just anyone.

Christine H.: Yeah, yeah, yeah. At this point, you can actually include your first more pointed call to actions. What that means is, ask them to do something. Before my email sequences were, at the moment I don't have one because I'm too lazy. I am going to do one for this year, and I'm going to record it so stay tuned, I'm going to accomplish that. In the beginning you don't ask them, you just give. You literally just give them. You give them your best story, and something you can maybe do is, "Oh, by the way, here is one of my most popular blog posts. Maybe this can help you to get started straightaway." Something that you already have, they can just click through.

Christine H.: You spoil them, basically. You give them stuff, "Here's a free training that I did. Maybe this can be helpful," and it talks about what I've just talked about in the email. Then, by the time you have the email with a client testimonial, that's when you can actually start asking for something from them. Which could be, "Why don't you book a call and see? If you have questions, just reply here, or just book a call with me." I think this is a good time when you can slowly start to ask for something. Still, don't tell them about a paying program yet.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, I agree. Amy Porterfield calls this micro-conversions, which I really like. You can do this sort of through your email sequence, and my micro-conversions are always in the PSs. I'll be like, "PS: I have an Instagram account where I share business training for health coaches. Make sure to follow me if you're interested." Then, the next might be guests, have a YouTube channel, blah-blah-blah.

Kendra Perry: It's these micro-conversions where they're just small. They're not really asking much of anyone. There's just letting people know that they can click here, get more information. It gets them used to clicking. I always throw those in the PS. I throw them in pretty much any email that I sent out. There's always a PS that tells them to check to something like, "Do you know of a podcast? Check on my podcast. Subscribe if you're interested." Sometimes, people want to binge your stuff. They want more. They're loving it, and they want to see more of your content. If you don't tell them it's there, then they're not going to go and find it on their own.

Christine H.: Exactly. You want to draw them into that rabbit hole of content of yours, into your universe, basically. You want them to gush about you. You want them to know you before you pitch them something. Oh, yeah.

Kendra Perry: Totally agree. Then, the sixth email, this is where I do the full pitch email. I don't just start by saying, "Hey, here's my thing, sign up." I actually explain the method, and how it has really helped me or the client. Again, you're seeding in more testimonial. You're like, "This is my method." I do recommend that, for whatever you do, create some sort of method, or some sort of step-by-step...

Christine H.: Always.

Kendra Perry: ... because there's certain people who make decisions based on knowing that there is a step-by-step process.

Christine H.: Yes, that there's logic behind the madness. [crosstalk 00:34:03] the process.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, they want to know that you can get them from A to B to C, and they want to know that there's a process. Not everyone makes decisions like that, but some people do, right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: There's a really interesting assessment called Colby Assessment. I actually use this with my sales page, because it tells you how people make decisions. Some people are quick start, so they make really quick, impulsive decisions. They're just super fast. There is the fact finders, which need all the information. They need to do all the research. Then, there's the... I can't remember the name of it, the one that wants the A, to B, to C. I can't remember the name of it, but you can look it up. They're the ones that want the step-by-step. That's why I think, regardless of what you're doing, turn it into a method, or a step-by-step process.

Christine H.: Always, and it has to be yours. Your signature method. For me, it's the Sleep Like A Boss method. It's signature, it's proprietary. Get a patent [inaudible 00:34:58], actually, and trademark. That's what's going to make you money, and maybe give you the possibility to even license it out later. Just be savvy about this, even if you're at the very beginning. If you think you're onto something and you've created something amazing that works, just keep it in mind.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, or even if your method is, you're like, we talk about diet, then we talk about life sell. Then, we talk about whatever. That's still a step-by-step process, right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: It doesn't need to be complicated.

Christine H.: No, no.

Kendra Perry: Just call it something, because that's what will draw people in. Then, it's easier because you're like, "This is my method. This is how it's helped. This is the process of my method, and this is the solution that I can help you achieve." You really want to focus on in the pitch email. Don't list out the features of your program, and what they're get. Features just meaning, you get a 60-minute consult, and then you get access to this app. Then, you get a Facebook group. Then, you get testing, or whatever. Those are features, and that's not what sells something. People buy because of the outcome you can help them achieve. You really want to go through, what are they going to feel like if they decide to invest in you? What's that going to look like? How is their life going to be better? How is their life going to be worse if they don't take this step, right?

Christine H.: Exactly. Exactly. Then, you literally just tell them, "Click here if this is for you," or something like that.

Kendra Perry: Yeah, and for a lot of you guys, I know a lot of you guys are doing one-on-one programs. You're just going to send them the link to your free sales call, or enrollment call, qualifying call, whatever you want to call it, where basically... We should do an episode on sales because I think a lot of people really fuck up sales calls. The sales call-

Christine H.: We will, we will.

Kendra Perry: It's not a health history. It's not a coaching call. It's literally you inviting them to see if they're ready to transform. You see if they're ready to change.

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: You just want to qualify them, and see if they actually are a good fit for your program, and if they're someone you can help.

Christine H.: There's something you can do as well, especially with health coaching. Our clients are not necessarily who are like us, or like Kendra and I at least, who do a lot of marketing geeking. You can actually tell them that you only work with a certain number of people, or are opening a certain number of spots. With me, that's actually true. I only work with five people at a time. Even if it's not true, it will help those who are on the fence finally prioritize.

Christine H.: It's not just like I'm pokering, or I'm lying. Essentially, [inaudible 00:37:22] game time, and this is time to change your health. When you just tell them, "I'm opening up my schedule for a certain number of people, so make sure you don't miss it," I think it still works. When I'm interested in something and I stop someone and I see it, it still triggers that FOMO in me, you know?

Kendra Perry: Yeah, yeah. I think people need urgency, right?

Christine H.: Yeah.

Kendra Perry: They need a bit of pressure to take action. Don't be upset if, at this point the person still doesn't book the call. Remember, we said 36 touch points, right?

Christine H.: [crosstalk 00:37:59] sometimes, yeah.

Kendra Perry: Exactly. It will depend on how many touch points they've had with you before they opted in for your freebie and went through the email sequence. Maybe they were only four in, so they might not be ready yet but that's why we're sending out weekly emails. That's where you want to email your list weekly, and provide them with value. For each one of those emails that you send out, that's another touch point. It's getting them closer to the point where, if they are interested in investing, that they're going to want to invest.

Christine H.: Agreed.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. If you want to get into more complex stuff, if people don't book the sales call you can follow up with more emails, reminding them or whatever. Obviously, that gets a bit more complicated, and I know a lot of you guys probably just have really basic email marketing skills. Just so you know what the possibility is, right?

Christine H.: Mm-hmm (affirmative)-

Kendra Perry: You can track people who book a sales call, and then follow up. Sometimes, people are interested, but then their baby starts crying and they go to the baby, and they've forgotten about it. It happens all the time, right?

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: What do we have? Four-second attention span? Less than that of a goldfish? There you go.

Christine H.: Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Absolutely, agreed.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: I think that's it. Is there anything that we have?

Kendra Perry: Yeah, so that's our email nurture sequence. We will make sure to link to the template, if you guys want to grab that in the show notes, which basically just explains out all these sort of steps in detail that you might find helpful. Then, you can be on our email list.

Christine H.: Exactly. There's different things. I know that we say a lot of the times that I'm actually just [inaudible 00:39:29] playing around with it at the moment. I'm seeing staggering numbers, but just like before we said you shouldn't use any pictures or so forth in your email. Actually, I'm using a new software that's called FlowDesk, and it's really pretty. It's in beta, so it's not sophisticated, it doesn't have bells and whistles yet, but it's beautiful. I have to say, my conversion is up in the 50%s, which is a lot, but you make conversion. It's doing really, really well. I know it's glitchy with other people sometimes, but it's actually shifted my perception on whether you should use photos or not. I can see that my crowd really likes, and responds to pretty, which makes sense because my whole branding is built on doing that [crosstalk 00:40:16].

Kendra Perry: I always recommend to keep images out of that first confirmation email. Right?

Christine H.: Oh, yeah. Don't do it on the first one.

Kendra Perry: That's when they're not engaged. Later on, once people have gone through my email sequence, and then I'm sending them weekly emails I might actually have images in those, because at that point they're engaged. They've opened up a few of my emails and told their email service provider that actually this is not spam.

Christine H.: Exactly. It looks just beautiful. We get so many ugly emails, and just having something pretty in your life, it's just going to help them to at least have a longer glance. Then, what I like about this one is actually that you have a little Instagram feed of your last three posts at the bottom. Which I really like, because it gives you an insight into what you do. It's just more personal, and I feel that as coaches we sell based on emotion. We sell based on, yes, people want the logic, but the first thing they're going to see is whether they can connect with you.

Christine H.: It's a bit of a different game than when you're selling an Etsy store or something like that. It's a different ball game. You have to keep that emotion in mind, which is also why the sequence we've just presented is based so much on story. Much more than if you sell underwear, or I don't know, something else, a product. This is just why it differentiates a bit from what you've seen in other podcasts, or marketing courses or so forth. It's just what we see works well with the people we want to help.

Kendra Perry: That's great. Is it an app that you use to add your Instagram feed into the bottom of the email?

Christine H.: It's just part of their software. It's just a drag and drop thing, and you just drop the Instagram feed and it connects to Instagram. It's a pain sometimes to use, switch it off, switch it on again. Then, every email that goes out, which is every week for me, has the last three posts of my Instagram feed.

Kendra Perry: That's awesome.

Christine H.: Yeah, it's pretty cool.

Kendra Perry: If you guys don't have FlowDesk, I'm sure there's a third party app out there that will do that, you know?

Christine H.: Yes. I'm sure there is.

Kendra Perry: I guarantee it. Yeah, I put all kinds of weird things into the bottom of my email. Especially during launches. Put little timers in there, and all that stuff.

Christine H.: Exactly.

Kendra Perry: I'm sure something exists. That's all we got for you guys, and I really hope that was helpful. If you are listening to this episode on your phone, make sure to screen shot this episode, share it to your Instagram stories and tag 360 Health Biz Podcast, and let us know your take homes. We would love that.

Christine H.: Love, love, love.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: Anything new, leave us a five-star review, let us know. Yeah, thanks for listening, I guess.

Kendra Perry: Yeah. Again, we're always shocked when anyone wants to listen to us.

Christine H.: I know. You just think it's a conversation between the two of us.

Kendra Perry: Yeah.

Christine H.: [inaudible 00:42:58] It's weird.

Kendra Perry: We're out there.

Christine H.: All right, you guys. Have a wonderful day. Make sure you listen to these other episodes that we have, and talk to you very soon.

Biz Bomb – How to Easily Set up a Website

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Welcome to your Biz Bomb episode of the 360 Health Biz podcast where we provide a quick tip to blow your mind and help your business. And today’s Biz Bomb is about ​setting up your website!

​Even the thought of starting your website can be SUPER scary - where do you even start and do you need a degree in Computer Science and Graphic Design to create it yourself? You don't! In fact you can do all of yourself with these quick guidelines.

For started you have to choose which platform you want to use - there's Wix, Squarepace to name a few but our favourite is WordPress because they have really easy templates where it's simply photo here, form there, text here and BAM, you've got your website. It also allows you to add different plugins to suit your needs - like payment functions, surveys, video, etc.

You'll also have to pick your domain name through a hosting service like GoDaddy, HostGator or SiteGround. Once you've got these two things, it just a matter of putting the two together and Christine has a great tip in today's episode if you're having trouble with this.

If you're listening to this on the podcast and you found this helpful, just screenshot this episode, share it to your stories, mention @360healthbizpodcast, and we will share it to our stories. Just let us know in that story, what were your biggest take-homes and did this work.

Connect with us on social:
instagram.com/360healthbizpodcast
facebook.com/360healthbizpodcast

@kendraperryinc
@sleeplikeaboss_

Kendra has opened enrolled for her HTMA Expert Course! Interested in learning how to interpret hair tissue mineral analysis? Learn more here: https://go.kendraperry.net/htma

TRANSCRIPTS

Hello everyone and welcome to the 360 Health Biz podcast, Biz Bomb. And today I want to talk to you about very quickly how I set up my websites. So my first business was sleeplikeababy.lu then it turned into sleeplikeaboss.com. I also have the domain sleeoretreat.vip, the Holistic Sleep Institute, Women's Divine Sleep Summit was one of mine. I set up quite a few website in my time and here's what I learned, no matter uno, try to get everything at one service, meaning your domain and also your hosting. How does this whole thing actually work? So you have different systems. Do you have something like Squarespace or Wix where you get to domain and then you get your hosting, add that, and then you have your template for your website as well.

This is basically their platform and their builder, meaning that you use their tools to then afterwards, create your website and build it together. Photo here, form there, text here. Now, the other thing that you can do is that you go with WordPress and WordPress is basically a program where you can then use a builder and it just, it has its pros and cons. I like it because it gives you a lot more flexibility of what you're going to integrate in your website because you have something that's called a plugin that's constantly developed. There are tons and tons and tons of plugins and they all have different functions. Whereas with Squarespace and with Wix, you will need to use whatever they provide. A more limited option. If you want to go with WordPress, and it's also better for SEO I found apparently, but what you do is you get your domain at one of those hosting services and there are different ones.

There's GoDaddy, this HostGator, and the one that I use over and over again is SiteGround. I love SiteGround. It is not [inaudible 00:01:54] here, but I just found them very, very reliable. They have a great chat, they have a great support system. I really enjoy them. So what you do is you get to domain there. Then you get to your hosting there, so you buy a hosting package and then when you go into your back office, which they call a C panel, you add WordPress. Now very quickly, wordpress.com and wordpress.org are two different services. WordPress.com is basically a blogging platform. You are going to install WordPress, which is this platform to build things in to basically manage your website and it's wordpress.org but your hosting service has that all set up for you. Now what you can do if you're totally new into this, that's what I do.

I open a chat, a live chat with them and then just tell them, help I want this domain, I see it's available, I've just bought it. How do I get hosting and how can I get WordPress back site and usually they will then set it up for you so you don't have to do anything. Literally, they will guide you through it. And most of the time if you help them and you tell them, I have no clue what to do, they would set it up for you up to the moment where you can just go to your website and log into the background and then start building.

And the builder that I use this Thrive Themes. There are many different ones out there, but that's the one that I'd like to use. I hope that this has given you a little bit of insight how this all works and what you need to do. I would recommend get your domain and your hosting at the same provider. I like SiteGround and ask them to set it up for you. That's what I would do. I hope this has been helpful and a little bit of clarification and I see you again next week.

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